Salaries for Physics Jobs in the UK

In summary: Do you want to become a prof?I'm not sure yet. I am considering doing a degree in Physics and then going on to do a masters or a PhD, whichever is more suitable at the time. Doing two subjects may limit my options though. Do you think it would hinder my job prospects?It depends on the field you go into. If you want to become a physicist then it won't matter, but if you want to go into business then it would be a good idea to have a degree in business. The average salary of a professor at my university is $115,000 a year.
  • #1
_Mayday_
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Firstly let me say that I am not about to pick a career purely on salary and from what I have heard Physics isn't going to make me a millionaire. As I am very much certain of a job in physics or somehow related to physics whether it be in management or in engineering, I would like to know what type of salary to expect. I can understand that this can vary with both which field you go into and also what stage of your career you are at.

Could anyone provide some information on salary, even if it is quite a broad approximate. If it helps I am considering going into either Nuclear Physics, Astrophysics or Cosmology. I am located int he UK so any numbers from the UK I would expect would be a more accurate relfelction, though anything would be great.

Thanks!

_Mayday_
 
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  • #2
_Mayday_ said:
Firstly let me say that I am not about to pick a career purely on salary and from what I have heard Physics isn't going to make me a millionaire. As I am very much certain of a job in physics or somehow related to physics whether it be in management or in engineering, I would like to know what type of salary to expect. I can understand that this can vary with both which field you go into and also what stage of your career you are at.

Could anyone provide some information on salary, even if it is quite a broad approximate. If it helps I am considering going into either Nuclear Physics, Astrophysics or Cosmology. I am located int he UK so any numbers from the UK I would expect would be a more accurate relfelction, though anything would be great.

Thanks!

_Mayday_

What kind of position? Academic (lecturer/reader/professor), working in industry, working for the government, teaching non-University level, etc.?
 
  • #3
I would like to work in a physics environment. An example would be working at a place like CERN or somewhere else where I can apply my knowledge and expertise to either research or development of something.

I have considered education but that would be later in my career and probably be at a non-university level.
 
  • #4
1500 euros to start, per month and after taxes. AT BEST !

marlon
 
  • #5
I have read froms oem sources that it is like £30,000 a year and some even say £50,000 but these are probably after a long time. Marlon, would I then be correct in say that starting off can prove quite difficult in terms of money?
 
  • #6
_Mayday_ said:
I have read froms oem sources that it is like £30,000 a year and some even say £50,000 but these are probably after a long time. Marlon, would I then be correct in say that starting off can prove quite difficult in terms of money?

Difficult ? How ?

marlon
 
  • #7
In comparison to another job, say for example one in accountancy there is a marked difference in your starting salary. My passion lies in physics so salary is irrelevant in terms of deciding whether to follow physics further or not.
 
  • #8
Then why comparing to other jobs ? It doesn't matter right ?

Who cares ?marlon
 
  • #9
No. I would like to know how much I would earn following a particular career. I would find it difficult to judge how it is paid when it is just a number, so I would like to compare it to another profession so that it gives me an idea of how much we are talking about.

You have said 1500 Euros per month, to start off with, I have read that some jobs can get upto the £40/50,000 mark and was wondering if this is actually the case.

Thanks for you help so far though marlon. :smile:
 
  • #10
All i know is that banking pays much better than research :)

marlon

edit : well, if you have a good position in this bank
 
  • #11
I am taking business classes, but my interest really lies in Physics though as I am sure is the case with a lot of people their careers go down a different path. :smile:
 
  • #12
Just follow your heart man...I am sure you will turn out fine.marlon
 
  • #13
Cheers Marlon.

Will you be in chat tomorrow?
 
  • #14
i will be chatting yes, if Moonbear gves me permission

marlon
 
  • #15
Why do you need permission?

I should pop in for a few hours I think.
 
  • #16
I have been looking at some university courses. I have found one that is a 3 year course and has both Physics and Business Studies merged into one course. I would have thought doing two subjects would limit the amount of work done compared to a degree in only the one subject. Would this hinder my job prospects? I think Business Skills can be applied to most fields and so may prove useful.
 
  • #17
The average salary of a prof at my university is $115,000 a year. And that's low as a country standard I believe. (Canada)
 
  • #18
Wow.

CaptainQuaser said:
The average salary of a prof at my university is $115,000 a year. And that's low as a country standard I believe. (Canada)

Wow, the would mean that physicists have a much better opportunity (salary wise) in Canada rather then USA...(I compared it with some salary info websites and surveys)

:smile:
 
  • #19
I just read that in our school paper, it includes all professors, so I am not sure where physics profs fit in, but I'm sure its not too far off that. I would think law and business may be paid more, but I'm not sure.
 
  • #20
actually a combined degree in business and physics may put you in a good position for a position (managerial) in an industrial company
 
  • #21
Oerg said:
actually a combined degree in business and physics may put you in a good position for a position (managerial) in an industrial company

Well this is what I had thought, as I am not only going down the one route but I would be dividing my time between two subjects. :uhh:

I am not sure if that is a good or a bad thing...
 
  • #22
Earnings

Median annual earnings of physicists were 94,240 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $72,910 and $117,080. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $52,070, and the highest 10 percent earned 143,570.

Median annual earnings of astronomers were $95,740 in 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $62,050 and $125,420, the lowest 10 percent less than $44,590, and the highest 10 percent more than $145,600.

According to a 2007 National Association of Colleges and Employers survey, the average annual starting salary offer to physics doctoral degree candidates was $52,469.

The American Institute of Physics reported a median annual salary of $80,000 in 2006 for its members with Ph.D.’s (excluding those in postdoctoral positions) who were employed by a university on a 9-10 month salary; the median was $112,700 for those who held a Ph.D. and worked at a federally funded research and development center; and $110,000 for self-employed physicists who hold a Ph.D. Those working in temporary postdoctoral positions earned significantly less.

The average annual salary for physicists employed by the Federal Government was $111,769 in 2007; for astronomy and space scientists, it was $117,570.

Source: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos052.htm (Department of US Labor, Statistics)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #23
Thanks Feldoh
 
  • #25
When discussing faculty positions, one should really clarify if the stated salary is for a 9- or 10-month period vs. a 12-month period.
 

What is the average salary for physics jobs in the UK?

The average salary for physics jobs in the UK is approximately £35,000 per year. However, this can vary greatly depending on factors such as location, experience, and industry.

What industries offer the highest paying physics jobs in the UK?

The industries that offer the highest paying physics jobs in the UK include research and development, aerospace and defense, and technology and telecommunications.

What factors can impact the salary for physics jobs in the UK?

The factors that can impact the salary for physics jobs in the UK include level of education and experience, location, industry, and job title. Negotiating skills and demand for specific skills can also play a role in salary.

Are there any additional benefits that come with physics jobs in the UK?

In addition to salary, many physics jobs in the UK also offer benefits such as health insurance, retirement plans, paid time off, and opportunities for professional development and advancement.

What steps can I take to increase my salary in a physics job in the UK?

To increase your salary in a physics job in the UK, you can consider obtaining higher levels of education and specialized skills, gaining experience in high-demand industries or roles, and effectively negotiating for higher pay and benefits.

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