Should I stick with Computer Eng or switch to CompSci?

In summary, the speaker has been coding for several years and is considering switching to computer science. They have made a lot of money and created interesting projects through freelance coding. They are currently a computer engineering major and have looked at all the courses offered at their university, with the exception of a few. They have made a chart outlining the pros and cons of switching to CS and must make a decision before the end of the week.Some of the pros of switching to CS include having an easier workload, knowing most of the content in the first 4 years, and being one of the top coders in their class/school. They also enjoy the topics more and believe their coding skills will improve. However, there are also cons such as having
  • #1
I've been coding for several years and I've considered switching to computer science. I've made tons of money freelance coding, and I've made some really cool things in the past. I am currently a computer engineering major. Upon looking at every course offered at my Uni, I know all of them with the exception of a few:

-some higher level data structures & algorithms class (can take this as CpE, i already know the basics)
-neural networks (not really useful for me)
-compilers (CpE can take this)
-more advanced combinatorics/probability

I've made a little chart outlining the pro's and benefits of switching/not switching. I can't decide but have to before the end of the week

Switch to CS:
Pros:
-easier, less work (4 courses per semester, and i will probably know most of them)
-know nearly all of the content in the first 4 years, with the exception of the above
-will be one of the top coders in the class/school
-i enjoy the topics more, seeing as i code/do math in my spare time whenever possible
-coding skills will improve
-will be learning a lot of stuff i already know, tons of A+'s
-i love theroetical math
-i won't have to look forward to summers so that i can code/do math all day- i can do it all day forever

Cons:
-will have to start all over again (finishing my first year in CpE)
-wont be in the top engineering school in the country anymore
-the CS department isn't best in the country (2nd best, but engineering is #1)
-if i switch ill never be able to get into engineering again in my life; but i can always get into computer science later in life if i want
-i will know squat about circuits, but staying in CpE ill know the basics of circuits, and will continue living the coder lyfe during summers
-i will be seen as code monkey for the rest of my life
-complexity analysis is sort of useless past a certain point, i.e., the point engineers stop at
-will be learning a ton of stuff i already know
-will be around "noobs" who can't code that well; i.e. people who don't live the coder lyfe like i do
-will only code in high level languages
-wont have the title "Engineer"
-wont learn anything about circuits
-no more assembly- i really enjoy low level coding
-computer science is "lower" as it accepts people with 70's whereas engineering requires high 90's
-women love engineers; i won't be one :(
-people will think I am stupid and that i wasnt able to do engineering and will constantly bring this up until i die
-people will think lower of me, that i am indecisive and that i can't finish what i start
-extra computer science will be easy for me to learn on the side, seeing as all i need to do is read 1-2 books in my spare time and keep up with my coding hobbies
 
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  • #2
Half of your Cons involve things that other people think.
 
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  • #3
axmls said:
Have of your Cons involve things that other people think.

Yes. What other people think of you is important too.
 
  • #4
x86 said:
I've been coding for several years and I've considered switching to computer science. I've made tons of money freelance coding, and I've made some really cool things in the past. I am currently a computer engineering major. Upon looking at every course offered at my Uni, I know all of them with the exception of a few:

-some higher level data structures & algorithms class (can take this as CpE, i already know the basics)
-neural networks (not really useful for me)
-compilers (CpE can take this)
-more advanced combinatorics/probability

I've made a little chart outlining the pro's and benefits of switching/not switching. I can't decide but have to before the end of the week

Switch to CS:
Pros:
-easier, less work (4 courses per semester, and i will probably know most of them)
-know nearly all of the content in the first 4 years, with the exception of the above
-will be one of the top coders in the class/school
-i enjoy the topics more, seeing as i code/do math in my spare time whenever possible
-coding skills will improve
-will be learning a lot of stuff i already know, tons of A+'s
-i love theroetical math
-i won't have to look forward to summers so that i can code/do math all day- i can do it all day forever

Cons:
-will have to start all over again (finishing my first year in CpE)
-wont be in the top engineering school in the country anymore
-the CS department isn't best in the country (2nd best, but engineering is #1)
-if i switch ill never be able to get into engineering again in my life; but i can always get into computer science later in life if i want
-i will know squat about circuits, but staying in CpE ill know the basics of circuits, and will continue living the coder lyfe during summers
-i will be seen as code monkey for the rest of my life
-complexity analysis is sort of useless past a certain point, i.e., the point engineers stop at
-will be learning a ton of stuff i already know
-will be around "noobs" who can't code that well; i.e. people who don't live the coder lyfe like i do
-will only code in high level languages
-wont have the title "Engineer"
-wont learn anything about circuits
-no more assembly- i really enjoy low level coding
-computer science is "lower" as it accepts people with 70's whereas engineering requires high 90's
-women love engineers; i won't be one :(
-people will think I am stupid and that i wasnt able to do engineering and will constantly bring this up until i die
-people will think lower of me, that i am indecisive and that i can't finish what i start
-extra computer science will be easy for me to learn on the side, seeing as all i need to do is read 1-2 books in my spare time and keep up with my coding hobbies

There quite a few Engineers that I work with who have comp sci degrees...
I know people who majored in comp sci that are now doing vcomputer hardware/ vhdl
i know people who majored in computer engineering that now work as software engineers
I know electrical engineers that now work as software engineers
I know people who majored in computer science that are now doing low level programming
etc...

1. if you like something, do it
2. many comp engineering majors get hired as engineers
 
  • #5


I cannot make the decision for you, but I can provide some guidance and considerations to help you make an informed decision.

Firstly, it is important to understand the differences between computer engineering and computer science. Computer engineering typically focuses on the hardware and physical components of computers, while computer science focuses on the software and theoretical aspects of computing. It seems like you have a strong interest and aptitude for coding and math, which align more with computer science. However, if you are also interested in circuits and hardware, computer engineering may be a better fit for you.

In terms of job opportunities, both computer engineering and computer science are in high demand and offer competitive salaries. It ultimately depends on your specific skills and interests, as well as the job market in your area.

It is also worth considering the courses offered in each program. While it may seem like you already know most of the content in the computer science program, it is important to keep in mind that there may be advanced topics and new technologies that you have not yet been exposed to. Additionally, having a well-rounded education in both hardware and software can be beneficial in the long run.

Another important factor to consider is your long-term career goals. If you see yourself as a software developer or working in a more theoretical and research-based field, computer science may be a better fit. However, if you are interested in designing and building hardware systems, computer engineering may be a better option.

Lastly, it is important to not base your decision solely on external factors such as status or the opinions of others. It is ultimately your education and your career, so it is important to choose a path that aligns with your interests and goals.

In summary, I would suggest carefully considering the differences between computer engineering and computer science, as well as your personal interests and career goals, before making a decision. Both fields offer valuable skills and opportunities, so it ultimately depends on what you are most passionate about.
 

1. Should I switch from Computer Engineering to Computer Science?

It ultimately depends on your personal interests and career goals. Computer Engineering combines principles from both Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, while Computer Science focuses more on software development and programming. If you have a strong interest in both hardware and software, Computer Engineering may be the better choice. However, if you are more interested in software development and programming, switching to Computer Science may be a better fit.

2. What are the main differences between Computer Engineering and Computer Science?

The main difference between the two is that Computer Engineering focuses on the design and development of computer hardware and systems, while Computer Science focuses on software development and programming. Computer Engineering also incorporates principles from Electrical Engineering, such as circuit design and electronics. Computer Science, on the other hand, delves deeper into algorithms, data structures, and software development methodologies.

3. Will switching to Computer Science affect my job opportunities?

Both Computer Engineering and Computer Science are in-demand fields with a wide range of job opportunities. Switching from one to the other may not greatly impact your job prospects, as many employers seek candidates with a strong foundation in both hardware and software. However, it is important to research the specific job market in your area and see which field may have more opportunities.

4. Which major is more challenging: Computer Engineering or Computer Science?

This is a subjective question as both majors require a strong understanding of math and problem-solving skills. Computer Engineering may be more challenging for those who struggle with abstract concepts and prefer hands-on work, while Computer Science may be more challenging for those who struggle with programming and coding. Ultimately, the difficulty of either major will depend on your strengths and interests.

5. What kind of job can I get with a degree in Computer Engineering or Computer Science?

Both majors offer a wide range of job opportunities in various industries such as technology, healthcare, finance, and government. Some common job titles for Computer Engineering graduates include embedded systems engineer, network engineer, and hardware designer. Computer Science graduates often pursue careers as software developers, web developers, or data analysts. However, with the rapid advancement of technology, new job roles are constantly emerging, providing a diverse range of career options for both majors.

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