Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: Simple Electrical Trick Question Maybe?

  1. Jan 23, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    I had posted another thread a week ago where I was given a function q(t) that t was defined in millisecond, and I had to evaluate q(t) at 0 and infinity then I had to do the same thing when I found the current I(t) in Coulombs/ms, Now i have do the same further more by finding P(t)..power...and W(t) watt-second/energy used, I believe

    3. The attempt at a solution

    By simply converting my equation I(t) to seconds I was able to find the amount of amperes a second, however, to find power there seems to be a missing "X" factor when will help me find the Power, I would need to know at least voltage or watts to figure either one out, Seems I have one unknown here voltage which I don't know where to derive from with just Amperes, not given any electrical resistance because this function is not modelling or was given said diagram
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 24, 2010 #2
    Jesus christ, BUMP
     
  4. Jan 24, 2010 #3
    I do believe there is a missing unknown, that is needed to solve for power in terms of watts? Can anyone confirm this?
     
  5. Jan 24, 2010 #4

    cepheid

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The thread has had a lot of views. The reason no one has answered is because it it really hard to know what you are talking about just from this post.

    I looked at the thread you referred back to (note: *I* had to search for it)...

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=370136

    ...and basically you're going to have to be a lot clearer about what question you are asking here. What power are you referring to? If you want to compute the power delivered by a source that is driving this current I(t), you need to know the voltage of that source as a function of time.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook