Since the past week, I find myself depressed,..

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In summary: Always remember that no matter how down you're feeling, it happens to everyone, and there's always someone who cares about you, even if you don't feel it at this moment.Whatever you do, don't let it control you. The more you dwell on it, the worse it will get.If it lasts for more then several weeks, seek the help of a doctor. If it lasts for more then several months, seek the help of a therapist.
  • #1
siddharth
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Since the past week, I find myself depressed, and I can't think of any reason why. :frown: To be more specific, there's this nagging feeling of futility.

So, what do you do in situations like this? I know this question is vague, but I feel slightly better sharing this. (First signs of insanity? I hope not!)
 
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  • #2
Do something that makes you happy and puts you in a good mood...go for a walk, visit a friend, paint a picture, watch a favorite movie, scream at the top of your lungs...whatever it is to let out your bad feelings. If that doesn't work try making a list of the good and bad in your life. Then look at the bad and see what you can change and what you need help changing. Then talk to someone you trust and try to figure out how to fix the things you're not happy with. Always remember that no matter how down you're feeling, it happens to everyone, and there's always someone who cares about you, even if you don't feel it at this moment. Think of something or someone that makes you smile and being happy and being less depressed will come along soon.
 
  • #3
Sometimes, its just the change of the seasons, and sometimes its just our own way of stepping back for a little while. Which is not a bad thing.
Being down for a week or even two is ok. When it happens to me, I find a charity group that could use a hand..and get busy helping others.
If it lasts for more then several weeks, seek the help of a doctor.
 
  • #4
siddharth said:
Since the past week, I find myself depressed, and I can't think of any reason why. :frown: To be more specific, there's this nagging feeling of futility.

So, what do you do in situations like this? I know this question is vague, but I feel slightly better sharing this. (First signs of insanity? I hope not!)

Exercise -- keep yourself active. Whatever you do, don't let it control you. The more you dwell on it, the worse it will get.
 
  • #5
hypatia said:
If it lasts for more then several weeks, seek the help of a doctor.

Proceed with extreme caution. Doctors are very quick with their prescription pads. Many doctors just think 'give them drugs', rather than discussing the problem to get to its route.

It is possible that a change in diet will remedy your melancholy:

Neal Nedley, MD, has spent his illustrious medical career researching and devising a program to treat -- and cure -- depression. Using a special vegan diet and a variety of practical strategies, Dr. Nedley has become widely recognized as a leading authority on helping people greatly improve the quality and productiving of their lives. He has helped tens of thousands of people recover from both severe and light cases of depression.

http://www.vegsource.com/articles2/nedley.htm (video talk, and further info)

Prescription drugs should be avoided. Big pharma, it has been reported, has two lobbyists for every single member of the US congress. Their products are mostly poison (am I allowed to say that, Evo? Am I allowed to express my opinion? It is so easy to get banned from this place).

A few links for your consideration:

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sep...icine_pushing_poisonous_drugs_says_doctor.htm

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sepp/2005/06/16/should_pharmaceutical_markets_decline.htm
 
  • #6
had to type something here to meet the requirments
 
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  • #7
hypatia said:
Sometimes, its just the change of the seasons, and sometimes its just our own way of stepping back for a little while. Which is not a bad thing.
Being down for a week or even two is ok. When it happens to me, I find a charity group that could use a hand..and get busy helping others.
If it lasts for more then several weeks, seek the help of a doctor.

I'd agree with hypatia on this one. Being 'down' is just part of life. Hopefully being 'up' occurs more often, and is more important, than being depressed, but you just need to recenter yourself and focus on what you do best. Look on the bright side of things, because life could certainly be worse...
 
  • #8
siddharth said:
Since the past week, I find myself depressed, and I can't think of any reason why. :frown: To be more specific, there's this nagging feeling of futility.

So, what do you do in situations like this? I know this question is vague, but I feel slightly better sharing this. (First signs of insanity? I hope not!)
There are physiological as well as psychological reasons for depression.

Factors which can help mitigate depression include:

Diet - make sure well balanced and perhaps consider vitamin supplements, particularly B-complex.

Sleep - make sure sleep is regular. Sleep deprivation or irregularity can contribute to depression.

Exercise - regular exercise can improve one's mental/psychological dispostion.

Aside from those - one's state of mind is a factor. If doubt becomes worry becomes anxiety, that can contribute to depression. If that appears to be the case, then one can attempt to identify the doubt and develop positive, constructive steps to deal with it.

It is normal for people to feel down or doubtful for a number of reasons. The point is to not allow it to become overwhelming or incapacitating. Talking about it to peers/friends whom one trusts may be helpful.

Refer to - http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/depression.cfm
 
  • #9
I've mentioned this before regarding similar thread topics:

Run. Get a good pair of running shoes and run regularly. Or something else that really exhausts the body.
 
  • #10
This may or may not apply, but FYI if nothing else: I have always battled bouts of depression, but some years ago I went into this terrible depression that was absolutely paralyzing. Literally, I barely had the energy to get out of bed or off the couch. It was unlike anything experience before. So I finally went to the doctor who then misdiagnosed my depression as a thyroid problem. When this was finally ruled out, he decided that it was psychological. So then I went to counseling for six months. The psychologist decided that my problem was my family and childhood, so he put me on Prozac, which did seem to help, but eventually the depression returned.

After some time the pattern became clear [of course I had to figure this out, not the doctors]: It was my allergies! Now, when I feel that horrible darkness coming over me, I know that it's time to start taking my Benadryl. It is my allergy early warning system. Usually the depression sets in about a week or two before the normal symptoms even begin to come on. I could hardly believe that it was really that simple, but it was.

A few years after this, it started coming out in the media that allergies can cause depression. NOW THEY TELL ME!
 
  • #11
Ivan Seeking said:
A few years after this, it started coming out in the media that allergies can cause depression. NOW THEY TELL ME!

How bizarre. How do they know depression isn't causing allergies?

I wish I knew something to say to make you feel better, sid. I can tell you this: I like seeing you online and reading your posts. I think you are a very nice and smart person. You are helpful and kind and you have patiently helped a lot of people with frustrating problems here. And you brightened the day for many of us when you brought us those crosswords. :smile: So, I am not really sure what you mean when you talk about a feeling of futility, but by definition futility means "uselessness", and that's something that I would never associate with you. While you're pursuing those larger ambitions, don't forget about the small ways in which you impact people's lives. You make a difference, and you are appreciated. It's been said, "God sends great angels in times of sore dismay; but the little ones go in and out all day."
 
  • #12
siddharth said:
Since the past week, I find myself depressed, and I can't think of any reason why. :frown: To be more specific, there's this nagging feeling of futility.

So, what do you do in situations like this? I know this question is vague, but I feel slightly better sharing this. (First signs of insanity? I hope not!)

Have you been working too hard?

:smile: I already know I'm insane, it's not so bad, really. :wink:
 
  • #13
Math Is Hard said:
How bizarre. How do they know depression isn't causing allergies?

:smile: :smile: :smile: In my case, the 580,000 acres of grass fields are the first clue. Not to mention that Benadryl would have to be a much more effective anti-depressant than Prozac. But in my case there is no doubt. It is as predicatable as the seasons [actually, as predicatable as the grass seed harvest time], and the Benadryl works within a day, every time.

However,
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11506004/
 
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  • #14
I thought you were kidding. In my case it all is very obvious, but it seems that your point is entirely valid.
 
  • #15
Ivan Seeking said:
I thought you were kidding. In my case it all is very obvious, but it seems that your point is entirely valid.

I was only thinking about it because it appears that only correlational studies have been done on this, something I've been studying this quarter in my loathesome research methods class. Correlational studies tend to suffer from directionality and 3rd variable problems. Could allergies trigger depression, or could depression trigger allergies? Or could some third variable, like time of year, be triggering both? I've been told that we are prohibited from drawing any causal conclusions from correlational studies because they are considered non-experimental methods.
 
  • #16
Ivan Seeking said:
and the Benadryl works within a day, every time.
Benadryl has never worked for me. I have MAJOR allergies and it is like taking water.
 
  • #17
Evo said:
Benadryl has never worked for me. I have MAJOR allergies and it is like taking water.
Benadryl does little, besides causing me to be so drowsy that I can fall asleep unexpectedly. This is not a good thing.
 
  • #18
Ivan Seeking said:
...After some time the pattern became clear [of course I had to figure this out, not the doctors]: It was my allergies! Now, when I feel that horrible darkness coming over me, I know that it's time to start taking my Benadryl...
Benadryl has always made me drowsy and a little loopy. I have switched to Allegra, which is wonderful! It lasts longer than Benadryl and doesn't have any side effects (at least for me). If Benadryl slows you down, you might see an allergist and ask about it.
 
  • #19
Math Is Hard said:
I was only thinking about it because it appears that only correlational studies have been done on this, something I've been studying this quarter in my loathesome research methods class. Correlational studies tend to suffer from directionality and 3rd variable problems. Could allergies trigger depression, or could depression trigger allergies? Or could some third variable, like time of year, be triggering both? I've been told that we are prohibited from drawing any causal conclusions from correlational studies because they are considered non-experimental methods.

All very true. It could simply be all associated with season. Though, if taking Benedryl fixes it, then at least in Ivan's case, that's all that matters. It sounds even more plausible in his case, if Benedryl is the treatment of choice, since Benedryl would otherwise seem to exacerbate depression symptoms of fatigue/lethargy since it induces drowsiness all by itself.
 
  • #20
Ivan Seeking said:
Not to mention that Benadryl would have to be a much more effective anti-depressant than Prozac.

Odd thing about the two:

Prozac was invented at Eli Lilly by a team headed by Dr. Ray W. Fuller, with Drs. Bryan B. Molloy and David T. Wong. They were later awarded the Pharmaceutical Discoverer's Award from NARSAD (National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression) for this. [1] [2] The molecule of Prozac has its origins in Diphenhydramine. In the 1960s it was found that diphenhydramine inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter serotonin. This discovery led to a search for viable antidepressants with similar structures and fewer side effects, culminating in the invention of fluoxetine (Prozac), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). A similar search had previously led to the synthesis of the first SSRI zimelidine from chlorpheniramine, also an antihistamine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prozac

The active ingredient in Benedryl is diphenhydramine hydrochloride. Prozac is derived from benedryl, so to speak.
 
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  • #21
siddharth said:
Since the past week, I find myself depressed, and I can't think of any reason why. :frown: To be more specific, there's this nagging feeling of futility.

So, what do you do in situations like this? I know this question is vague, but I feel slightly better sharing this. (First signs of insanity? I hope not!)

you must be having that councelling service at your college...in such cases it is best to take their help...there usually are bunch of professors who are always ready to talk and help...in such cases talking itself is the best cure...and if you want to hide your identity ,you may do so because these services appreciate full confidentiality..!

In my campus,i always had contacts with my professors and had a big intermingling group...occasionally visiting such experienced and learned people never let's your life enter into grey.
 
  • #22
marcusl said:
Benadryl has always made me drowsy and a little loopy. I have switched to Allegra, which is wonderful! It lasts longer than Benadryl and doesn't have any side effects (at least for me). If Benadryl slows you down, you might see an allergist and ask about it.

Actually, in recent years I have ammended my routine and start the allergy season with Allegra. When we are into the height of the grass season, or when I feel that depression coming on, or when I feel my eyes swelling shut, I switch to Benadryl. For me, Benadryl was a miracle. Nothing I have taken even comes close to being as effective, including prescription meds. For years I was wasting my time with stuff like Allerest and Pseudofed, but even the scripts tried after that didn't seem to help much.

At first the Benadryl did knock me for a loop, but with time that goes away. Anyway, there is no doubt in my mind that allergies can cause depression. AFAIC, I'm living proof.
 
  • #23
After a night's sleep, some introspection and a long conversation, I've decided to take a break and change things. A vacation, a change in lifestyle and taking a break should hopefully make things better. Thanks for the advice everyone, and for the nice words MIH. I'll be back in January before my next semester, so see you then!
 
  • #24
zoobyshoe said:
Odd thing about the two:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prozac

The active ingredient in Benedryl is diphenhydramine hydrochloride. Prozac is derived from benedryl, so to speak.

Interesting. That prompted me to take a quick peek at the literature to see if there's a relationship between depression and histamine, and I came across a few things. Here's one example:
The central histaminergic neuron system modulates the wakefulness, sleep-awake cycle, appetite control, learning and memory, and emotion. Previous studies have reported changes in neuronal histamine release and its metabolism under stress conditions in the mammalian brain. In this study, we examined, using positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]-doxepin, whether the histaminergic neuron system is involved in human depression. Cerebral histamine H1 receptor (H(1)R) binding was measured in 10 patients with major depression and in 10 normal age-matched subjects using PET and [(11)C]-doxepin. Data were calculated by a graphical analysis on voxel-by-voxel and ROI (region of interests) basis. Binding potential (BP) values for [(11)C]-doxepin binding in the frontal and prefrontal cortices, and cingulate gyrus were significantly lower in the depressed patients than those in the normal control subjects. There was no area of the brain where [(11)C]-doxepin binding was significantly higher in the depressed patients than in the controls. ROI-based analysis also revealed that BP values for [(11)C]-doxepin binding in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus decreased in proportion to self-rating depressive scales scores. The results of this study demonstrate that depressed patients have decreased brain H(1)R binding and that this decrease correlates with the severity of depression symptoms. It is therefore suggested that the histaminergic neuron system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and that its modulation may prove to be useful in the treatment of depression.
Kano M, Fukudo S, Tashiro A, Utsumi A, Tamura D, Itoh M, Iwata R, Tashiro M, Mochizuki H, Funaki Y, Kato M, Hongo M, Yanai K. Decreased histamine H1 receptor binding in the brain of depressed patients. Eur J Neurosci. 2004 Aug;20(3):803-10. .
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?CMD=Display&DB=pubmed

I think I'm going to look into this a bit more tomorrow.
 
  • #25
Moonbear said:
I think I'm going to look into this a bit more tomorrow.

I don't understand many of the terms, but it sounds like it's saying depression is linked to certain neurons losing their ability to use the histamines. If that's true, it seems like an anti-histamine would just make it worse.
 
  • #26
zoobyshoe said:
I don't understand many of the terms, but it sounds like it's saying depression is linked to certain neurons losing their ability to use the histamines. If that's true, it seems like an anti-histamine would just make it worse.

I think you got the gist of it, and that's what has me puzzled too. I didn't get the whole article yet, just the abstract, so I want to read more about it first. A couple possibilities come to mind, including that it might be effects on different receptor subtypes, that maybe blocking one with an antihistamine helps promote upregulation of another. Or, the receptors might be a bit different in the brain than the rest of the body, and the antihistamines are having agonist rather than antagonist actions. These are total handwaving explanations here. I just thought it was interesting that histamines might be involved at all.
 
  • #27
siddharth said:
After a night's sleep, some introspection and a long conversation, I've decided to take a break and change things. A vacation, a change in lifestyle and taking a break should hopefully make things better. Thanks for the advice everyone, and for the nice words MIH. I'll be back in January before my next semester, so see you then!
Sounds like a good idea. Relax and Enjoy the break! See you around, siddharth.
 
  • #28
Moonbear said:
I just thought it was interesting that histamines might be involved at all.
Here's more handwaving speculation: to the extent allergies increase histamine production they might overload the appropriate receptors rendering them less able to use it. By lowering the levels anthistamines might give these receptors a rest and allow things to return to normal. I have no idea if this "overload leads to fatigue" has any basis in reality, though. Ever heard of such a thing?
 
  • #29
zoobyshoe said:
Here's more handwaving speculation: to the extent allergies increase histamine production they might overload the appropriate receptors rendering them less able to use it. By lowering the levels anthistamines might give these receptors a rest and allow things to return to normal. I have no idea if this "overload leads to fatigue" has any basis in reality, though. Ever heard of such a thing?

Actually, yes, that's a possibility I was pondering while wandering off to lunch today. And, yes, there are documented examples of this (not so much "fatigue" but downregulation or loss of sensitivity or responsiveness). Two examples that come to mind off the top of my head are insulin resistance in some forms of diabetes, and downregulation of pituitary gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors in the presence of continuous high doses of GnRH, which shuts down luteinizing hormone production.

I'm going to download those articles now and see what I can learn.
 
  • #30
I'm just glad you all are finally catching up. :rolleyes:

:biggrin:
 
  • #31
A quick update; and I have a witness. :biggrin:

The week before last, I realized that the pre-allergy depression was hitting, so I started on my Allegra. But I could tell that it wasn't really working and already it was time for full strength Benedryl - this is about a month early. Immediately after starting the Benedryl I began to feel better. This was based entirely on my state of mind with no other symptoms. Two days later it was announced on the local news that allergies are hitting early and hard, and that people with allergies need to start their medications. Within the week I could feel the typical allergy eye irritation starting if I missed a dose of Benedryl.
 
  • #32
I am jealous, Ivan! Benadryl knocks me out so quick that If I took it, I'd be out in 30 minutes or so, and I'd be REALLY hard to wake up. I can't live that way. My wife is seemingly very resistant to the narcotic effects of Benadryl and can drink a cup of coffee and go to bed and sleep soundly. I'm not wired that way.
 
  • #33
Ivan Seeking said:
. . . it was announced on the local news that allergies are hitting early and hard, and that people with allergies need to start their medications. . . .
Must be global warming. :biggrin:
 
  • #34
turbo-1 said:
I am jealous, Ivan! Benadryl knocks me out so quick that If I took it, I'd be out in 30 minutes or so, and I'd be REALLY hard to wake up. I can't live that way. My wife is seemingly very resistant to the narcotic effects of Benadryl and can drink a cup of coffee and go to bed and sleep soundly. I'm not wired that way.

The first year that I started taking it I spent about a week asleep. Since then it has improved every year. Sometime I can adjust by starting with a quarter dose the first week, then half, etc, if I start early enough. But now - about the tenth year I think - I tolerate it pretty well either way. Even going full dose immediately this year has only slowed me down a bit - a few days of runnning about half speed and a little extra sleep, then I'm okay.
 

Related to Since the past week, I find myself depressed,..

1. What could be causing my sudden feelings of depression?

There could be many factors that contribute to feelings of depression, such as stress, a recent loss or change, a chemical imbalance in the brain, or a history of mental health issues. It is important to discuss your symptoms with a mental health professional to determine the underlying cause.

2. Is it normal to feel depressed for a week?

It is not uncommon for individuals to experience periods of depression that last for a week or longer. However, if these feelings persist for more than two weeks and interfere with daily functioning, it may be a sign of a more serious mental health issue and should be addressed with a professional.

3. What are some ways to cope with depression?

Some ways to cope with depression include talking to a therapist or counselor, practicing self-care and self-compassion, engaging in activities that bring joy, and seeking support from loved ones. It is important to find a combination of coping strategies that work for you.

4. Can depression be treated?

Yes, depression can be treated through a variety of methods, such as therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes. It is important to seek help from a mental health professional to determine the best course of treatment for your specific needs.

5. What should I do if I am feeling suicidal?

If you are feeling suicidal, it is important to seek help immediately. You can reach out to a crisis hotline, such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or go to your nearest emergency room. Remember, you are not alone and there is always help available.

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