SoI'm dropping out, what should I do?

  • Thread starter fizziks
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  • #26
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DUDE!!!!! even with a minimum wage job you can move up, my father worked as a kid cleanin the parkin lot to manager in a year.He got tired of fast food tho and started workin on other crap.
My dad did alot of dumb mistakes to tho, he declinesd a USC scolership, declined a offer from his buddy that prolly could have made him a millioneir by now.(offer was like to invest something in McDs for like 50Grand that wouldda made him like own a big part of company) He dropped out after two years but still worked hard and now my pops is a supervisor(very high on the ladder) at Northrup Grummen.:cool: (northrup is a company that build parts for nasa, space shuttles, jet fighters, satellites and etc):cool:
You gotta just work really hard. try to study alot or get into another school, DONT GIVE UP! try everything you can do that will benifit you:tongue2: (xpt prostitution lol):tongue2: work hard, study harder and get back in the game!!!
 
  • #27
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DUDE!!!!! even with a minimum wage job you can move up

I second that. You know, Hubble (the guy who made the observation that pointed to expansion of the universe) has a good friend called Humason. In fact in older textbooks Hubble Law was called Hubble-Humason Law (poor Humason is fading out from history...). Hubble had a high regard for him and they worked closely together.

Humason, however, had a humble beginning.

Humason, born in Dodge Centre, Minnesota, dropped out of school at 14 to hang around Mount Wilson Observatory, California. For a while he was a mule driver for the pack trains that carried construction materials to the observatory from the Sierra Madre. In 1917 he joined the observatory staff as a janitor, but was quickly promoted, becoming assistant astronomer 1919.

http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/Biographies/MainBiographies/H/Humason/1.html [Broken]
 
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  • #28
JasonRox
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I second that. You know, Hubble (the guy who made the observation that pointed to expansion of the universe) has a good friend called Humason. In fact in older textbooks Hubble Law was called Hubble-Humason Law (poor Humason is fading out from history...). Hubble had a high regard for him and they worked closely together.

Humason, however, had a humble beginning.



http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/Biographies/MainBiographies/H/Humason/1.html [Broken]

I think you guys are forgetting this is year 2007 where paper is important.
 
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  • #29
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I think you guys are forgetting this is year 2007 where paper is important.

Yea. You are correct. But the point is it is not the end of the world if you drop out. You can find a way back if you are determined. The post wasn't meant to say anything about the academic but to give encouragement.
 
  • #30
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Even if he does drop out, his credits don't magically just dissapear do they? for intance if he wanted to go back in say 2 years when he's less depressed and is ready to go back his credits are still there aren't they?

I took a year off and everything was fine still I even still got all my scholarships but mine was for a medical situation but he could also be considered that if he plays his cards right.
 
  • #31
I think you guys are forgetting this is year 2007 where paper is important.

I think we are actually beginning to see a shift towards paper becoming less important. It's becoming more and more obvious that a college degree does not mean much in the US.

I am at an "elite" school and just the other day I came across a girl who is a junior and said she hasn't read an entire book during her entire college career. She's not the first person here that I've heard admit things like this, and brag about them, nontheless.

I think we are getting to the point where many employers would rather higher someone from a foreign country with only a high school degree than they would a born US citizen with a bachelors degree.

Of course there are exceptions. You obviously can't become something like a physicist or engineer (depending on what the engineering job requirement actually is) without a rigorous education.
 
  • #32
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I'm fairly certain that is true. A lot of schools don't consider your credit void until like 5 years or something like that. It may vary though. The main problem I see is finding a uni that would accept a senior that had one semster left. Many schools seem to have transfer cut off time at junior year.
 
  • #33
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I think we are actually beginning to see a shift towards paper becoming less important. It's becoming more and more obvious that a college degree does not mean much in the US.

I am at an "elite" school and just the other day I came across a girl who is a junior and said she hasn't read an entire book during her entire college career. She's not the first person here that I've heard admit things like this, and brag about them, nontheless.

I think we are getting to the point where many employers would rather higher someone from a foreign country with only a high school degree than they would a born US citizen with a bachelors degree.

Of course there are exceptions. You obviously can't become something like a physicist or engineer (depending on what the engineering job requirement actually is) without a rigorous education.

I'm more inclinde to disagree with your statement. I feel that it is still very important for a person to hold a degree if they expect to work in a professional field.

In my field, Urban and regional planning, I find it hard to find jobs that require less than a degree in a related major. I have seen where some jobs don't require a major but experience working with GIS.

Most jobs I find require a degree plus 1-3 years of internship work. Furthmore, A master degree seems to be equal to 1 year of experience.
 
  • #34
Your field does sound rather bureaucratic. It wouldn't surprise me if it were literally impossible to hire someone without a degree.

Anyway, I'm not saying degrees are not important. I just think they are becoming slightly less important. I also think they will become even less important in the future. (I make exception for engineering and the hard sciences)
 
  • #35
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You can't possibly be serious...... This has to be the most absurd thing I have ever heard. That someone would actually think that this is a possible life plan worth considering. Not only is this a plan of being lazy, but it also involves years of taking advantage of those who care about you most. Please don't insult the OP, he is looking for help, and this isn't it.

I was waiting for a comment. Actually this is my worst case senario since I am studying non career focused subjects like pure maths and theoretical physics plus I am not a smart cookie and just hanging on in my subjects so it's good to know that there is a bottom floor I can fall into. The idea of staying at home and do maths and physics and other things that interest you without ever thinking about financial issues is not that bad.
 
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  • #36
J77
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I was waiting for a comment. Actually this is my worst case senario since I am studying non career focused subjects like pure maths and theoretical physics plus I am not a smart cookie and just hanging on in my subjects so it's good to know that there is a bottom floor I can fall into. The idea of staying at home and do maths and physics and other things that interest you without ever thinking about financial issues is not that bad.
:surprised :surprised :surprised

That sounds terrible.

And how would one support one's parents?

What a waste of the greatness that is life that would be.
 
  • #37
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:surprised :surprised :surprised

That sounds terrible.

And how would one support one's parents?

What a waste of the greatness that is life that would be.

This senario can only be applied to people who have parents that are capable of earning a stable income and live conservatively or frugally. The point is the parents do not need support and in turn have some left over for the child. But again to support a modest lifestyle in most cases.
 
  • #38
J77
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This senario can only be applied to people who have parents that are capable of earning a stable income and live conservatively or frugally. The point is the parents do not need support and in turn have some left over for the child. But again to support a modest lifestyle in most cases.
Ummm...

I think the point is that parents should not have to support their children for their whole lives, unless the children are truly physically or mentally unable to find a job - any job!
 
  • #39
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I was waiting for a comment. Actually this is my worst case senario since I am studying non career focused subjects like pure maths and theoretical physics
In life, one needs to be realistic. Even if you like theoretical physics, making a career out of it is completely impossible unless you are a genius or very lucky. I think you are being very selfish here. You should be contributing to society. Go study solid state physics or engineering. THAT is what we need. Do you really wanna pass your life as an unsuccesful theoretical physicist. Eventually, you will grow tired of it and you will regret not having chosen for a decent professional career. That's our basic human nature.

The "parents" stuff is just an illusion. You wanna feel safe in every possible scenario, but, it ain't gonna be like that. That is MY promise to YOU.

marlon
 
  • #40
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I agree with Marlon what you love now isn't what your going to like later once you find out you have no g/f or wife, nor kids, nor any friends because your the kid who stayed at home all his life. (if thats even possible)

That is also kinda freaky in my opinion. I've never heard of someone living their whole life with their parents, it just isn't right.

I had a lot of friends who were big into drugs or just hated school and I thought they would never leave the house. At least they joined the service and contributed to society.

I'm usually the person who says, Do what you love, but I never thought this as an option, it never occurred to me that people thought that way.

But again I come from a family who can barely support themselves let alone a child staying at home their whole lives. So I never had the mind set of being financially safe at home but rather, study hard so you don't end up in the same situation.
 
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  • #41
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I'm usually the person who says, Do what you love, but I never thought this as an option, it never occurred to me that people thought that way.
Lots of people think like that just "to feel safe". But it is an illusion since reality requires you to TAKE RESPONSABILITY ! One should get up, face life and enjoy it. One can do anything he/she wants to do but never forget that we are living in THE REAL WORLD and not some "personally idealised version" of it.

I agree, do what you love to do, but never forget that we are living in reaility. At least, the mentally sane are...

:wink:

marlon
 
  • #42
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Wow. Just WOW. I just got accepted to a decent grad school based on my credentials before this semester and they don't my current situation. I still haven't settled everything yet until the Spring-Summer intersession break is over.

I've kept myself sane by watching youtube videos and listening to internet radio all day.
 
  • #43
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Ok, that's all well and good, but you still need to graduate to go to grad school. Your grad school will more than likely require that your undergraduate institution send them an official notice that you've graduated.
 
  • #44
G01
Homework Helper
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I was waiting for a comment. Actually this is my worst case senario since I am studying non career focused subjects like pure maths and theoretical physics plus I am not a smart cookie and just hanging on in my subjects so it's good to know that there is a bottom floor I can fall into. The idea of staying at home and do maths and physics and other things that interest you without ever thinking about financial issues is not that bad.

It really shouldn't be a consideration, no matter how abstract you field is.....you still can get a job working fast food if need be.

What you are talking about is mooching.....which is universally considered to not be a viable option for high school dropout or out-of-work physicist alike.

I would change your plans, saying you have trouble getting a job because of your choice of field or your grades, and so you have to mooch off your parents doesn't work. That previous statement is nothing more than an excuse to do nothing and be lazy, which is never acceptable anywhere, even if you would be happy doing it.
 
  • #45
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Lots of people think like that just "to feel safe". But it is an illusion since reality requires you to TAKE RESPONSABILITY ! One should get up, face life and enjoy it. One can do anything he/she wants to do but never forget that we are living in THE REAL WORLD and not some "personally idealised version" of it.

I agree, do what you love to do, but never forget that we are living in reaility. At least, the mentally sane are...

:wink:

marlon

It's 'good' to think that we live in a real world and we should take responsibility and all but if you think about it a bit more, you realise that you are not going to live forever and will die oneday. Just thinking about that makes me feel like everything is an illusion. Certainly when and after I die, which will come in a finite amount of time, everything to me will be an illusion by definition. If there was a possiblity that I could live forever than I will start to take more repsonsibility perhaps.


Living from the parents isn't all that unjustified. Honestly, I wish I was never born. So from this perspective some fault is already impinged on the parents and they can repay it back or break even with me if they provide a decent living for me for the rest of my life. Including giving me a decent inheritance after they die so that I can sustain myself after they die. Not having kids or partner is actually morally justified because given that I wish I was never born why would I produce a kid who might be like me and also wish they were never born? Also what kind of person would want to stay with a 'loser' like me? If I really cared for someone, I would actually recommand them not to be my partner for their own wellbeing and future.

You might call me selfish but at least I have been rational and have taken some moral high ground as well. However having said all that, I do realise that before I die, I am living in some sort of reality and biologically programmed to do and not do certain things so I will be trying hard to accomplish certain things like get a Phd and get an academic job if successful but always keeping in mind that there is a lowest level I can fall to which would not be 'wrong' if I am to be unsuccessful.
 
  • #46
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even if you are dropping out of where you currently go to college, whats wrong with community college and getting a job as a skilled person or start a small business? my neighbor owns a camera-security system company that he started himself and yet he's an immigrant and had to start from the ground up.

you could be a manager or a technician or even electrician or repairman. get a job that will always be in demand. factory workers can be outsourced or replaced over time but there will always be a need for people like government workers (IRS agents, social workers, policemen...) teachers, home repair, etc. we will always be in demand for those things. just because you aren't a computer programmer doesn't mean you wont find a job thats in demand

dropping out of college is not the end of the world. you could still do lots of things even after this. just take some time to explore the possibilities and get back out there
 
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  • #47
It's 'good' to think that we live in a real world and we should take responsibility and all but if you think about it a bit more, you realise that you are not going to live forever and will die oneday. Just thinking about that makes me feel like everything is an illusion. Certainly when and after I die, which will come in a finite amount of time, everything to me will be an illusion by definition. If there was a possiblity that I could live forever than I will start to take more repsonsibility perhaps.


Living from the parents isn't all that unjustified. Honestly, I wish I was never born. So from this perspective some fault is already impinged on the parents and they can repay it back or break even with me if they provide a decent living for me for the rest of my life. Including giving me a decent inheritance after they die so that I can sustain myself after they die. Not having kids or partner is actually morally justified because given that I wish I was never born why would I produce a kid who might be like me and also wish they were never born? Also what kind of person would want to stay with a 'loser' like me? If I really cared for someone, I would actually recommand them not to be my partner for their own wellbeing and future.

You might call me selfish but at least I have been rational and have taken some moral high ground as well. However having said all that, I do realise that before I die, I am living in some sort of reality and biologically programmed to do and not do certain things so I will be trying hard to accomplish certain things like get a Phd and get an academic job if successful but always keeping in mind that there is a lowest level I can fall to which would not be 'wrong' if I am to be unsuccessful.
It might've been better if you had just written off your original reply as sarcasm.
 
  • #48
EP
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Thats kinda what I assumed it was when I read it. Hahaha.
 
  • #49
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No I am not trying to be sarcastic. The main point has always been that for me there is a lowest level which I can fall into and have infact informed my parents that. I do think that this level is not ideal as it's better to research and study maths or physics at an institution than at home. But I am not forced to do only career focused activities.
 
  • #50
J77
1,083
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Your parents are too soft if they let you stay at home in your 20s.

Don't you think they deserve some time for themselves?

Your comments are edgy...
 

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