Solving a TI-83/84 Calculator Exam Question: 771 vs. 1,059

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem from a TI-83/84 calculator exam regarding the number of family members attending a meeting in 2008. The problem involves calculating the total number of family members based on the growth rate of 6% each year. The two methods used to solve the problem resulted in different answers, 771 and 1,059 total family members. The conversation also includes a side comment about math nerds and gender stereotypes.
  • #1
jfhorns7853
13
0
This is a question from a TI-83/84 calculator exam that I took on February 14th. (haha what a shocker a math nerd without a girlfriend.) Anyway, this is one of the few that I missed, and when I revisited it I noticed that I had actually misread the question at hand. Anyway, the problem is that the two ways that I have tried to solve the problem have given me vastly different answers.

1.
A family has met on September 1st to visit since 1961. At that time, there were 71 family members, and each year the family grew as a net result of marriages, divorces, adoptions, births, and deaths by an amount equal to the largest integer less that 6% of the total from the previous year. There were 39 family members who missed the 2008 meeting. How many attended the 2008 meeting?

2.
The first included programing the calculator which gave me an answer of 771 total family members. Umm, I guess I could post the programming lines? Ask if you do!

The second was a different take on the problem, in which I instead set it up like one would if trying to find compound interest. That gave me: 1,059 total family members.

1,059 = 71(1 + .06/1)^(1*47)

3.
I've already stated my answers above, but here they are again:
Calculator Program: 771 total family members.
Compound Interest: 1,059 total family members.
 
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  • #2
I went about it the second way, too.

missbooty87

(oh, and math nerds are not only guys. they are girls, too. And I was without a boyfriend on feb 14 ha ha ha i think its a nerd thing)
 
  • #3
haha Sorry to leave out the fairer side of the math nerds or really nerds in general! haha so yeah, The second way makes more sense I think.
 
  • #4
Especially since you haven't shown us what you did in programming your calculator.
 

Related to Solving a TI-83/84 Calculator Exam Question: 771 vs. 1,059

1. How do I solve a TI-83/84 calculator exam question involving large numbers like 771 and 1,059?

The first step is to make sure your calculator is in the correct mode. Press the "MODE" button and select "FLOAT" if you are working with decimal numbers or "MATHPRINT" if you are working with fractions. This will ensure that your calculator displays all the digits in your answer.

2. What is the best way to enter large numbers like 771 and 1,059 into my TI-83/84 calculator?

To enter large numbers, you can use the "EE" button. For example, to enter 771, you would press "7", then "7", then "1", and finally "EE" followed by "2". This represents 7.71 x 10^2. Similarly, to enter 1,059, you would press "1", then "0", then "5", then "9", and finally "EE" followed by "3" to represent 1.059 x 10^3.

3. How can I perform calculations with large numbers on my TI-83/84 calculator without losing any digits?

If your calculator is in the "FLOAT" mode, it will automatically display all the digits in your answer. However, if you are using the "MATHPRINT" mode, you will need to press the "ENTER" button twice after performing a calculation to view all the digits in your answer.

4. What is the difference between using the "EE" button and the "x10^x" button for entering large numbers on my TI-83/84 calculator?

Both the "EE" button and the "x10^x" button represent scientific notation. The "EE" button is used to enter numbers in scientific notation, while the "x10^x" button is used to convert a decimal number to scientific notation. For example, if you want to enter 1.5 x 10^6, you would press "1", then "5", then "EE", and then "6". If you want to convert the number 1,500,000 to scientific notation, you would press "1", then "5", then "0", then "EE", and then "6".

5. How do I use my TI-83/84 calculator to convert a number from scientific notation to decimal form?

To convert a number from scientific notation to decimal form, you can use the "x10^x" button. For example, if you want to convert 2.5 x 10^3 to decimal form, you would press "2.5", then "x10^x", and then "3". This will give you the result of 2500. Alternatively, you can also use the "EE" button by entering the number in scientific notation and then pressing "ENTER" twice to view the decimal form of the number.

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