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Some questions concerning degrees!

  1. Mar 27, 2013 #1
    Hello, I am a high school senior who is considering attending the Florida Atlantic University (for those who are familiar with it). I am most likely going to major in either physics or mathematics and was initially aiming for a bachelors of science. There is a twist however. I am also aiming for the honors college at the Jupiter campus but they only offer bachelors of arts degrees. I was wondering if it is worth it to get a bachelors of arts at the liberal arts type honors college rather than a bachelors of science at the regular program. Has anyone here experienced either one? If so, which would you recommend? Any responses will be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 27, 2013 #2

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    You have to analyze the list of required classes and the other classes available to you as electives, for the majors that you're interested in, under both programs, in order to decide which path is "better" for you. Also take into account the availability of research opportunities at both campuses, and the general atmosphere (small classes versus large classes, etc.).

    The names of the degrees (BS versus BA) in and of themselves don't matter much if at all.
     
  4. Mar 27, 2013 #3

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Taking a look at the FAU honors college program in physics:

    http://www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/academics_majors_physics.htm

    The minimum required courses for a physics concentration are pretty minimal, and in fact they warn that it's not enough for grad school. I would say that if you take most of the physics electives, and some of the math electives:

    Intro Modern Physics
    Intermediate Mechanics
    Thermal Physics
    Electricity & Magnetism
    Statistical Physics
    Intro Quantum Physics

    Calculus III
    Differential Equations
    Matrix Theory (probably another name for Linear Algebra)
    plus a programming course or two

    and then top it off with some research experience either there (if available) or at the main campus, and maybe an advanced course or two at the main campus, you'd be in decent shape for grad school in physics (assuming that's what you're aiming for).
     
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