(Statics) Truss with no vertical members, will it work

In summary, the task is to design a truss system to support a 50 kN weight at a pin joint in the center of a void in the most cost-effective way. The equations used are the sum of moments and the sum of forces. One possible solution is to use two horizontal members from the edges of the void to the weight, but the equations are difficult to figure out and the solution may be statically indeterminate. A diagram of the truss and information about how it is anchored to the edges of the void are needed to fully understand the problem.
  • #1
joebobjoe
6
0

Homework Statement



Supposed to support a 50 kN weight at a pin joint at the center of a void as cost effectively as possible using trusses (e.g., trusses and pin joints have costs)

Homework Equations



Basic sum of moments and sum of forces = 0

The Attempt at a Solution



Why can't I just use two horizontal members from the edges of the void to the weight. Since the trusses are ideal and can't expand the weight won't fall. But I'm having a hard time figuring out the equations. Maybe this solution is statically indeterminate? At the center pin joint I get sum of all forces in x direction = tension in truss 1 - tension in truss two. In the y direction I just get -50 kN. But somehow the forces in the y direction have to equal 0. When I look at it I know it will work (I think there would just be a very strong moment in the trusses). But when I do the equations I'm confused. Does the 50 kN translate into a moment? Why can't we have ideal trusses without vertical components?
 
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  • #2
How about providing a diagram of your truss. How is it anchored to the edges of the void? Are you saying the beams do not streach or bend?
 

Related to (Statics) Truss with no vertical members, will it work

1. Is it possible to build a truss without any vertical members?

Yes, it is possible to build a truss without any vertical members. This type of truss is known as a "cantilever truss" and it is commonly used in construction projects.

2. How does a truss with no vertical members work?

A truss with no vertical members relies on diagonal members to distribute the load and provide stability. The diagonal members are placed in a way that allows them to resist tension and compression forces, similar to how vertical members would work in a traditional truss.

3. What are the advantages of using a truss with no vertical members?

One advantage of using a truss with no vertical members is that it allows for more open and flexible design options. It also reduces the overall weight of the structure, which can be beneficial for certain construction projects.

4. Are there any limitations to using a truss with no vertical members?

Yes, there are limitations to using a truss with no vertical members. These trusses are not suitable for supporting heavy loads or for long spans. They also require careful design and calculation to ensure structural stability.

5. Can a truss with no vertical members be used in all types of construction?

No, a truss with no vertical members may not be suitable for all types of construction. They are commonly used in buildings and structures with lighter loads, such as residential homes and small commercial buildings. For larger and heavier structures, traditional trusses with vertical members are typically used for added stability and support.

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