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Superconductor structure and contents

  1. Mar 6, 2016 #1
    Hi. What are superconductor ions? Are they naturally occurring ions inside the lattice structure of a superconductor when it's manufactured or are they ions introduced artificially to a superconductor's lattice ? And do the ions have spin?
     
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  3. Mar 6, 2016 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Where exactly did you find the term "superconducting ions"? This is not the term that I've encountered, and I've worked in the field of superconditivity over a large fraction of my career.

    This topic should also have been posted on the Solid State Forum since this is really on the physics of superconductivity rather than on the engineering aspect of it.

    Zz.
     
  4. Mar 6, 2016 #3
    Sorry about the forum placement... I'm not sure if that's the correct phrase... I just barely remembered it as it is. I'm just wondering if a superconductor can have ions in it's lattice. What therm have you encountered? Copper pairs?
     
  5. Mar 6, 2016 #4

    ZapperZ

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    A superconductor is no different than any other solid. They ALL have ions sitting at the lattice points! This is basic solid state physics. That is why your question is puzzling.

    You also need to be aware of a very confusing term that you have used. An "ion", even if it belongs to a superconductor, isn't called a "superconducting ion" because that phrase implies that the ion ITSELF is superconducting. This is false. The MATERIAL is superconducting. The ion isn't!

    Thus, unless you have a clear source that explains this term, then you are essentially asking about a non-existent entity of a "superconducting ion". No one can answer about the properties of something that doesn't exist.

    Zz.
     
  6. Mar 6, 2016 #5
    Right...I guess I meant superconductor'S ions.
    So can the ions spin, are they able to be influenced by a magnetic field? What kind of material would have ions most capable of spinning influenced(the ions) by a magnetic field?
     
  7. Mar 6, 2016 #6

    ZapperZ

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    What do you mean by "ion spin"? Are you asking of an ion in a lattice can have a net angular momentum, or are you asking if it can physically "spin" like a top?

    I think you need to stop referring to anything related to superconductor and superconductivity, because this is basic solid state physics question.

    Zz.
     
  8. Mar 6, 2016 #7
    Well I'm not sure what kind of spin... I'm leaning towards actual physical spin like a wheel.
     
  9. Mar 6, 2016 #8

    ZapperZ

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    No, it doesn't. What ever gave you the idea that atoms or ions do such a thing? They don't do that in isolation, so why would they do that when fixed in a lattice?

    Zz.
     
  10. Mar 6, 2016 #9
    So what kind of spin is a "angular momentum"?

    Edit: I'm not saying that they can't be fixed in the lattice, they just have to rotate around their own axis like earth for example.
     
  11. Mar 6, 2016 #10

    ZapperZ

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    Do you notice that in this thread, we keep having to go several steps back each time I answer a question?

    I asked you why you think atoms have that property of spinning on their axis? They don't do that when they are isolated. So why do you think they would even do that when they are fixed in a lattice?

    This is now very far away from the topic that you created, i.e. it has nothing to do with any superconductivity, but rather basic quantum mechanics (i.e. it is not even solid state physics anymore) and learning about the behavior of atoms. So you can do one of two things: look up online the idea of angular momentum quantum number in quantum mechanics, or start a new thread in the Quantum Physics forum on this. I will warn you that you'd probably be asked how much have you tried to learn this on your own first before asking such a question, because this is a topic that whole chapters in books are written about. You need to learn about basic physics of atoms first.

    Zz.
     
  12. Mar 6, 2016 #11
    Well I was thinking maybe ions would behave differently in superconductors... like you don't see copper pairs in a kitchen spoon.

    Edit: any similarities between a superconductor and a Bose-Einstein condensate regarding their ions?
     
  13. Mar 6, 2016 #12

    ZapperZ

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    The ions in conventional superconductors only provide the "background phonons" as the coupling mechanism to create these Cooper pairs. Other than that, they are no different than your kitchen spoon! And no, they don't spin on their axes either!

    But you need to understand your kitchen spoon FIRST before to look at something more exotic than that, and I tend to lose my interest very quickly when I keep having to take several steps back and reach for more fundamental physics that one should to know first before tackling something like this.

    Zz.
     
  14. Mar 7, 2016 #13
    Right got it... Any place I can read about ions in Bose-Einstein condensate?
     
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