Suppose gravitons and Higgs were quasiparticles like phonons

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It's well known that gravitons expressed in QFT is perturbatively non-renormalizable at high energies. Higgs bosons suffers from quadratic radiative corrections.

Recently Verlinde proposed gravity is the result of entropy. This has led researches to speculate on the microscopic structure of spacetime.

In condense matter physics quasiparticles are known to exist.

Suppose that gravity is not a fundamental force, and gravitons, and higgs bosons are really quasiparticles in analogy to phonons. i.e Higgs is not a fundamental scalar but a composite, perhaps a 4-fermion quark or neutrino interaction. Would problems of run-away self-interactions pose a problem in this paradigm?

What would be the physics ramifications if we treat Higgs and gravity in analogy to quasiparticles in condense matter physics, and followed rules analogously to phonons?

i.e are there any virtual quasiparticles on this list that if they were to self-interact not lead to infinities so by analogy gravitons modeled on this would also not lead to infinities ?

Bipolaron A bound pair of two polarons
Chargon A quasiparticle produced as a result of electron spin-charge separation
Composite fermion Bound state of an electron and magnetic flux quanta
Configuron An elementary configurational excitation in an amorphous material which involves breaking of a chemical bond
Electron quasiparticle An electron as affected by the other forces and interactions in the solid
Electron hole (hole) A lack of electron in a valence band
Exciton A bound state of an electron and a hole
Fracton A collective quantized vibration on a substrate with a fractal structure.
Holon A quasi-particle resulting as a result of electron spin-charge separation
Libron A quasiparticle associated with the librational motion of molecules in a molecular crystal.
Magnon A coherent excitation of electron spins in a material
Majorana fermion A quasiparticle equal to its own antiparticle, emerging as a midgap state in certain superconductors
Phason Vibrational modes in a quasicrystal associated with atomic rearrangements
Phonon Vibrational modes in a crystal lattice associated with atomic shifts
Plasmon A coherent excitation of a plasma
Polaron A moving charged quasiparticle that is surrounded by ions in a material
Polariton A mixture of photon with other quasiparticles
Roton Elementary excitation in superfluid Helium-4
Soliton A self-reinforcing solitary excitation wave
Spinon A quasiparticle produced as a result of electron spin-charge separation
 

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  • #2
fzero
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There is an old class of models known as technicolor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technicolor_(physics [Broken])) in which the Higgs is a composite particle. You might want to research those models a bit. They aren't completely ruled out by experiment and collider physicists continue to search for signals in their data.
 
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  • #3
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In condense matter physics quasiparticles are known to exist.

Suppose that gravity is not a fundamental force, and gravitons, and higgs bosons are really quasiparticles in analogy to phonons. i.e Higgs is not a fundamental scalar but a composite, perhaps a 4-fermion quark or neutrino interaction.
Composite Higgs fields have been considered since ages, say early 80's, and here is a recent analysis that should answer your "suppose" question:
http://www-spires.dur.ac.uk/cgi-bin/spiface/hep/www?eprint=arXiv:1003.3251

Composite gravitons were not considered since around the same time, because the Weinberg-Witten theorem rules them out. So nothing to suppose here.

S.Weinberg and E. Witten, Limits On Massless Particles, Phys. Lett. B 96, 59 (1980).
 
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Composite Higgs fields have been considered since ages, say early 80's, and here is a recent analysis that should answer your "suppose" question:
http://www-spires.dur.ac.uk/cgi-bin/spiface/hep/www?eprint=arXiv:1003.3251

Composite gravitons were not considered since around the same time, because the Weinberg-Witten theorem rules them out. So nothing to suppose here.

S.Weinberg and E. Witten, Limits On Massless Particles, Phys. Lett. B 96, 59 (1980).

If gravitons are quasiparticles, does this imply they must be composite?

Does the WW-theorem apply to gravity as entropy?
 
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  • #5
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If gravitons are quasiparticles, does this imply they must be composite?
Sure, that's what a quasi-particle is supposed to be.

Does the WW-theorem apply to gravity as entropy?
I really can't answer for sure right now.
 
  • #6
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Composite Higgs fields have been considered since ages, say early 80's, and here is a recent analysis that should answer your "suppose" question:
http://www-spires.dur.ac.uk/cgi-bin/spiface/hep/www?eprint=arXiv:1003.3251

Composite gravitons were not considered since around the same time, because the Weinberg-Witten theorem rules them out. So nothing to suppose here.

S.Weinberg and E. Witten, Limits On Massless Particles, Phys. Lett. B 96, 59 (1980).
There is an old class of models known as technicolor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technicolor_(physics [Broken])) in which the Higgs is a composite particle. You might want to research those models a bit. They aren't completely ruled out by experiment and collider physicists continue to search for signals in their data.


If Higgs are composite in some way, is there still a hierachy problem?
 
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  • #7
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If Higgs are composite in some way, is there still a hierachy problem?
Depends on the details, but the idea is that this solves the problem - the Higgs composite scale is then given by some strong coupling dynamics, it can be due to some other gauge theory that forms a Higgs-like bound state at some dynamically generated scale, for example.

If you are interested in various incarnations of the Higgs mechanism, why don't you have a look into the following review: http://www-spires.dur.ac.uk/cgi-bin/spiface/hep/www?eprint=arXiv:0910.4976
This surveys the various ideas from a phenomenological point of view.
 
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  • #8
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Depends on the details, but the idea is that this solves the problem - the Higgs composite scale is then given by some strong coupling dynamics, it can be due to some other gauge theory that forms a Higgs-like bound state at some dynamically generated scale, for example.

If you are interested in various incarnations of the Higgs mechanism, why don't you have a look into the following review: http://www-spires.dur.ac.uk/cgi-bin/spiface/hep/www?eprint=arXiv:0910.4976
This surveys the various ideas from a phenomenological point of view.
I'll take a look, it seems the alternative, SUSY, and then SUSY-partners, then SUSY breaking mechanism, rather inelegant.
 
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