Tangential Acceleration of uniform motion

In summary, to find the magnitude of tangential acceleration in uniform circular motion, you can use the formula At = [dv/dt] where v is the speed and dv/dt is the rate of change of velocity. However, for uniform circular motion, this value is always zero. On the other hand, for non-uniform circular motion, the magnitude of tangential acceleration can be calculated using the formula |angular acceleration| x r. This is because tangential acceleration is caused by changes in the tangential speed of an object, which can be expressed as |angular acceleration| x r.
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How do you find the Magnitude of tangential acceleration if you have uniform circular motion? I know the formula for Tangential Acceleration; however I have no clue how to apply it to determine the Magnitude?
 
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  • #2
Its just the magnitude of the vector. It should just be V^2/r.
 
  • #3
student 1 said:
How do you find the Magnitude of tangential acceleration if you have uniform circular motion? I know the formula for Tangential Acceleration; however I have no clue how to apply it to determine the Magnitude?

The formula in the previous post is incorrect (that's the magnitude of the *radial* component of the acceleration). What formula are you using for tangential acc?
 
  • #4
student 1 said:
How do you find the Magnitude of tangential acceleration if you have uniform circular motion? I know the formula for Tangential Acceleration; however I have no clue how to apply it to determine the Magnitude?
Do you mean centripetal acceleration? If something is performing uniform circular motion, its tangential acceleration is zero. Or do you mean non-uniform circular motion, which will have a tangential component of acceleration?
 
  • #5
No, I mean tangential acceleration. That's probably the answer I'm looking for I just have to know how to express that the acceleration would be zero if it was uniform circular motion using words and one equation.
 
  • #6
Im suppose to use At=[dv/dt].
 
  • #7
student 1 said:
Im suppose to use At=[dv/dt].
OK, where v is the speed, not the velocity vector. For uniform circular motion, dv/dt = 0.
 
  • #8
Tangental acceleration can still exist on a object traveling in a circular path. The centripetal force just needs to change with respect to speed2, so it always equals m |v|2 / r.

The magnitude of tangental acceleration would be the magnitude of angular acceleration times r = |angular acceleration| x r.
 
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1. What is tangential acceleration in uniform motion?

Tangential acceleration is the rate of change of an object's tangential velocity in uniform motion. It is the acceleration that is parallel to the direction of motion and is caused by a change in speed.

2. How is tangential acceleration calculated?

Tangential acceleration (at) can be calculated using the formula at = vt / t, where vt is the tangential velocity and t is the time interval.

3. Can tangential acceleration be negative?

Yes, tangential acceleration can be negative. A negative tangential acceleration indicates that the object is slowing down or changing direction, while a positive tangential acceleration means that the object is speeding up or maintaining a constant speed in a straight line.

4. How is tangential acceleration related to centripetal acceleration?

Tangential acceleration and centripetal acceleration are closely related in uniform circular motion. Tangential acceleration is the component of acceleration that is tangent to the circular path, while centripetal acceleration is the component of acceleration that is directed towards the center of the circle. Both are needed to keep an object in circular motion.

5. What are some real-life examples of tangential acceleration in uniform motion?

Some examples of tangential acceleration in uniform motion include a car accelerating on a straight road, a roller coaster moving along a circular track, and a satellite orbiting around the Earth.

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