B Testing spacetime collapse at absolute zero

The other day I was pondering what happens at/near absolute zero so I did some googling and found articles talking about how it has been demonstrate that as you near absolute zero, the quantum effect start to have an increased range. However, is seems that perhaps the quantum effects only get larger because spacetime is collapsing in on itself. If this is correct, I would expect spacetime to be stretched toward the coldest spot. I don't know if this is in fact what is happening, but I believe it may be testable by simply chilling an atom to near absolute zero where the change in quantum effect appear to increase. If you shoot a laser (stream of individual photons?) past this chilled atom, if space time is stretched I would expect to see the light bend slightly. As a baseline you would want to do this with a "warm" atom as well and then compare the two.

So that is my idea. Any thoughts?

(I had no idea what thread level to select, so I selected the B.) /shrug
 
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