The Difference Between Two Indefinite Integrals

  • Thread starter PFuser1232
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  • #1
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I actually came across this question on social media. What is:

$$\int sin (x) \, dx - \int sin (x) \, dx$$

And I think the answer depends on how we interpret:

$$\int sin (x) \, dx$$

If we think of it as a single antiderivative, the answer would be zero. If we think of it as being representative of several antiderivatives of ##sin (x)##, the answer would be some arbitrary constant.

What do you think?
 
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  • #2
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I think "define non-standard or unclear notation if you use it".
 
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It's standard to evaluate indefinite integrals as the anti derivative of the function plus a constant of integration.

So I think ∫sin(x) dx-∫sinx(x) dx would just be equal to an arbitrary constant (as you said).
 

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