The effects of birth order on an individual's levels of stimulation

  1. A recent study of eighteen rhesus monkeys provides clues as to the effects of birth order on an individual's levels of stimulation.


    Could someone please explain the bold part?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Borek

    Staff: Mentor

    At the risk of stating the obvious: have you tried to read the study? Or at least the abstract?
     
  4. Ryan_m_b

    Staff: Mentor

    Please post a link to the study so that members can know what you're talking about.
     
  5. I don't have link. But here is the whole text that I have.

    "A recent study of eighteen rhesus monkeys provides clues as to the effects of birth order on an individual's levels of stimulation. The study showed that in stimulating situations (such as an encounter with an unfamiliar monkey), firstborn infant monkeys produce up to twice as much of the hormone cortisol, which primes the body for increased activity levels, as do their younger siblings. Firstborn humans also produce relatively high levels of cortisol in stimulating situations (such as the return of a parent after an absence). The study also found that during pregnancy, first-time mother monkeys had higher levels of cortisol than did those who had had several offspring."
     
  6. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    It's not a real study, it's an essay example for the GRE.

    http://poetsandquants.com/2011/02/0...riting-section-of-the-gre-test/1347718731000/
     
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