Therapy thread

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  • #1
EnumaElish
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Got issues? Dependency? Abuse? Control? Letting go, giving up, giving in? Grandiosity, narcissism, neurosis, nefariousness, spitting on people? Obsession, compulsion, bad dreams, daydreaming, hair splitting, nail biting, biting other people's nails, Dodgers fan? Here's your chance to generally discuss your issues in near-to-total anonymity where the entire world can read them, and participate (in the discussion, if not in the neurosis). Post away.
 

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  • #2
Evo
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I'm tired.
 
  • #3
BobG
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  • #4
FlexGunship
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[narcissism]I'm pretty awesome, but now I'm worried that I have no where to go! How can I get better? I'm already ridiculously good looking, amazingly intelligent, and I have the best sense of humor of anyone I know. What now?

Ugh, it's so depressing.[/narcissism]

Example: One time, at a friends house, there was a brand new roll of toilet paper. I hit it with my hand and sent it spinning. I dumped the entire roll on the ground in one try. And it was good stuff, too; Charmin, I think. Not that dollar-store crap.
 
  • #5
BobG
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[narcissism]I'm pretty awesome, but now I'm worried that I have no where to go! How can I get better? I'm already ridiculously good looking, amazingly intelligent, and I have the best sense of humor of anyone I know. What now?

Ugh, it's so depressing.[/narcissism]

Example: One time, at a friends house, there was a brand new roll of toilet paper. I hit it with my hand and sent it spinning. I dumped the entire roll on the ground in one try. And it was good stuff, too; Charmin, I think. Not that dollar-store crap.
Thank you! I get so ticked off at people that don't realize the toilet paper should hang down the back of the roll! But that might just be my OCD.
 
  • #6
FlexGunship
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Thank you! I get so ticked off at people that don't realize the toilet paper should hang down the back of the roll! But that might just be my OCD.
From the back? What? You mean the "wrong" way?
images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQyqx8cVVG-KikRw7QzmDinHwM61jXcjEcJ4XtRdv1NQ7S_zyVx.jpg

I mean, I Googled "backwards toilet paper" and... well... I'm sure I don't need to tell you what the result was.

EDIT: I have "CDO." It's like "OCD" but all of the letters are in alphabetical order as they should be.
 
  • #7
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My neurosis is ... Hey wait a minute. Are you sure this is anonymous?
 
  • #8
FlexGunship
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My neurosis is ... Hey wait a minute. Are you sure this is anonymous?
As long as your name isn't actually Jimmy Snyder, then you're safe. However, if you name is Jimmy Snyder, then let me get a pen... I mean... also safe!
 
  • #9
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As long as your name isn't actually Jimmy Snyder, then you're safe. However, if you name is Jimmy Snyder, then let me get a pen... I mean... also safe!
OK, grab a pen. When I pass by a disordered stack of cafeteria trays, I can't help but jiggle them so that they stack up correctly. It's not because I want them to line up, rather there's something about the way they collapse that reaches some inner part of me. If the first jiggle doesn't fix them all, I just walk away.
 
  • #10
BobG
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Those that let the toilet paper hang down the front of the roll tend to be pushy and controlling - definitely narcissistic characteristics.

Those that let the toilet paper hang down the back are extroverts, Communists, or cat owners (but, then, the last two categories usually consist of the same people).

People that buy one-ply tissue paper (your so-called dollar store crap) are risk averse people that pinch pennies.

Two-ply people tend to be liberal with a limited willingness to help others. They may not buy you a new car, but at least they'll spring for decent quality toilet paper.

The Mega roll people tend to suffer from insecurity - they go to any length to protect themselves from perceived threats, real or imagined.

The toilet paper practices of introverts aren't known at this time, as they tend to bar strange researchers from using their bathrooms.

A real life experience of an over the top person:

In 2005, I was dating a nice young lady named Lauren. One time when she used the bathroom at my apartment she put the new roll of toilet paper on backwards. This was, and still is, a pet peeve of mine. I changed it to the correct way and told Lauren about my pet peeve.

A few weeks later Lauren did it again. This time she was confused because last time she put it on backwards, I flipped it around, then showed her it was on wrong. As a result, when she did it again, she thought it was the right way. Ugh.

After she left I took a photo of the right way, and a photo of the wrong way and printed them both onto a piece of paper that I hung in the bathroom. It was a sort of a joke – I thought.



Lauren and I are not dating any more
 
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  • #11
Evo
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Those that let the toilet paper hang down the front of the roll tend to be pushy and controlling - definitely narcissistic characteristics.

Those that let the toilet paper hang down the back are extroverts, Communists, or cat owners (but, then, the last two categories usually consist of the same people).

People that buy one-ply tissue paper (your so-called dollar store crap) are risk averse people that pinch pennies.

Two-ply people tend to be liberal with a limited willingness to help others. They may not buy you a new car, but at least they'll spring for decent quality toilet paper.

The Mega roll people tend to suffer from insecurity - they go to any length to protect themselves from perceived threats, real or imagined.

The toilet paper practices of introverts aren't known at this time, as they tend to bar strange researchers from using their bathrooms.

A real life experience of an over the top person:
:rofl:
 
  • #12
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The toilet paper practices of introverts aren't known at this time, as they tend to bar strange researchers from using their bathrooms.
Sure there is. An introvert removes the TP from the hanger and keeps it on the counter.
:surprised
 
  • #13
EnumaElish
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w/r/t the TP, I grew up thinking that the wrong way is the right way, so I rebelled against it by purposefully hanging it the other way. The OTHER other way, that is.

Sometimes in a supermarket I see shopping baskets stacked up imperfectly (usually because some of their handles are not folded down). I make a point of re-stacking them in a more orderly fashion; I don't know if it's an obsession disguised as good citizenship, or the other way around.
 
  • #14
BobG
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I do have one personality "quirk". I tend to overanalyze everything.

Even things that should be strictly emotional or romantic issues. For example: I was considering asking someone out, but then found out her ex-husband was getting a biopsy to see whether he had pancreatic cancer or not. I laid out all the potential problems (even though divorced for over 10 years, they did successfully coparent a daughter and even wound up being friends; the adult daughter lives with the mother and will be crushed, to say the least) and figured out how things could theoretically work out (people may want to support a dying friend, but they don't stop their own life; they've been divorced so long the daughter forgets they were ever married) and how there's no way this is going to work. Normal people said I was overanalyzing things and I should just ask her - things will either work out or not and something else entirely could keep it from working out (in fact, a few said his dying of cancer would be a good thing as she'd be vulnerable to anyone that offered emotional support).

Even things that are stupid. There's a reason the butter side always lands on the floor. It has to do with the moment of inertia of toast and its angular acceleration. Once on its way to the floor, the toast continues rotating at the same speed and that speed just happens to carry it just far enough for the butter side to be on the bottom when the toast hits the floor. Change the size of the toast or the height of the table and you can change which side lands up. For example, drop Ritz crackers instead and they have a different moment of inertia. Sure enough, the crackers manage to rotate all the way around until the non-buttered side lands on the floor. Granted, I was only able to make three successful trials. The dog ate the cracker before it hit the floor on the fourth attempt. Normal people think things like that are strange.

Even things that are really strange. The rocket booster for the Orbiting Geophysical Observatory launched in 1968 reentered the atmosphere a few days ago. The satellite, itself, will reenter the atmosphere before the end of May. This is strange since satellites in an elliptical orbit can't lose altitude at perigee until the orbit becomes circularized. Both of these objects have eccentricities over 0.9. In fact, they become more elliptical. Apogee goes up and perigee goes down. They go out so far that I think the Moon must tug on them when they're at apogee (since sometimes they behave like normal satellites, which must be when the Moon is on the other side of the Earth? - okay, this is something I just noticed a couple days ago, so I haven't actually done any analysis except notice the patterns in perigee/apogee heights and look at the direction of the Moon vector during a couple orbits). Normal people just say, "Huh? We're all going to be killed by a falling satellite!?" They just totally miss the point.

I overanalyze everything. Normal people comment on it all the time. I don't think it's something that anyone at PF would notice, though.
 
  • #15
I do have one personality "quirk". I tend to overanalyze everything.

Even things that should be strictly emotional or romantic issues. For example: I was considering asking someone out, but then found out her ex-husband was getting a biopsy to see whether he had pancreatic cancer or not. I laid out all the potential problems (even though divorced for over 10 years, they did successfully coparent a daughter and even wound up being friends; the adult daughter lives with the mother and will be crushed, to say the least) and figured out how things could theoretically work out (people may want to support a dying friend, but they don't stop their own life; they've been divorced so long the daughter forgets they were ever married) and how there's no way this is going to work. Normal people said I was overanalyzing things and I should just ask her - things will either work out or not and something else entirely could keep it from working out (in fact, a few said his dying of cancer would be a good thing as she'd be vulnerable to anyone that offered emotional support).

Even things that are stupid. There's a reason the butter side always lands on the floor. It has to do with the moment of inertia of toast and its angular acceleration. Once on its way to the floor, the toast continues rotating at the same speed and that speed just happens to carry it just far enough for the butter side to be on the bottom when the toast hits the floor. Change the size of the toast or the height of the table and you can change which side lands up. For example, drop Ritz crackers instead and they have a different moment of inertia. Sure enough, the crackers manage to rotate all the way around until the non-buttered side lands on the floor. Granted, I was only able to make three successful trials. The dog ate the cracker before it hit the floor on the fourth attempt. Normal people think things like that are strange.

Even things that are really strange. The rocket booster for the Orbiting Geophysical Observatory launched in 1968 reentered the atmosphere a few days ago. The satellite, itself, will reenter the atmosphere before the end of May. This is strange since satellites in an elliptical orbit can't lose altitude at perigee until the orbit becomes circularized. Both of these objects have eccentricities over 0.9. In fact, they become more elliptical. Apogee goes up and perigee goes down. They go out so far that I think the Moon must tug on them when they're at apogee (since sometimes they behave like normal satellites, which must be when the Moon is on the other side of the Earth? - okay, this is something I just noticed a couple days ago, so I haven't actually done any analysis except notice the patterns in perigee/apogee heights and look at the direction of the Moon vector during a couple orbits). Normal people just say, "Huh? We're all going to be killed by a falling satellite!?" They just totally miss the point.

I overanalyze everything. Normal people comment on it all the time. I don't think it's something that anyone at PF would notice, though.
re: bold... We notice, but we're all too busy overanalyzing to respond! I like how you think... it's that kind of mentality and view that makes it so lonely to think critically and have an education. The people you dislike... meh... but the people you love missing a point?... ouch. On the upside, I think that people (such as yourself) who have that quality mitigate it over time, and become exceptional teachers. You have to learn, not only the material, but how to move someone from one view of the universe (the sattelite falls!) to one that doesn't agree with what they feel and see everyday. It takes time and patience to use those everyday examples to make your point, instead of the raw analysis you describe.

In short, while the constant "rumbling" of analyzing intellectually can be... tiring... sometimes, you've already turned it into an advantage.


For me... temper, irritability, and a need to balance intellectual distance with emotional proximity gets me. I've always been keenly aware of the pain of others, and at some point when I was young, I remember beginning the process, consciously, of shutting that down so I could stop being sad, and think. Long story short... I spend a lot of time seeing very VERY sick people (mentally and physically, mostly the former) who have no hope of "full recover". I'm used to moving people from a point of total divorce with the world, to some kind of connection, but.. reaching out there each time, there's a small, cold part of me that's still trying to understand people more than help them.

There are those times where that part of me, that, "seed of monstrosity" that anyone in or around medicine is so guarded against, is right there, and it's just dispassionate curiosity and a desire to understand others and myself. MOSTLY, I want to help and learn now, but you can add and whittle when it comes to who you are, but nothing ever goes completely away.

Oh, and I enjoy 'spirited debate' so much, that sometimes I lose track of WHY, in the sheer joy of the debate itself. That is, and feels selfish and counterproductive, but I think, "stirring up trouble", is sometime I've realized is common to many educated people who are just stone-bored with what's said about the water-cooler. Anyway, that's all that's fit to share on a website, and more than I have before or likely will again.
 
  • #16
EnumaElish
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BobG said:
Normal people just say, "Huh? We're all going to be killed by a falling satellite!?"
Not to feign normality, but, are some people going to be killed by a falling satellite, anyway?
 
  • #17
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Not to feign normality, but, are some people going to be killed by a falling satellite, anyway?
Like WHO?

Come on, name one, and we'll do whatever we can to pull them out of the way of overimagined natural disaster.

I'll hike 150 miles through the desert with them myself, and I have the USAF survival school crendentials to make that happen.

If someone provided a plane ticket, I'd be there myself. I'm actually a rather nice, natural teacher.

So, I guess I'll choose to make it happen, since no one else seems willing to do it: I'm calling your bluff.
 
  • #18
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I see nothing here, Evo, as much as I disagree with your closing threads, here's one I'll back you up to the hilt.
 
  • #19
Evo
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I see nothing here, Evo, as much as I disagree with your closing threads, here's one I'll back you up to the hilt.
What are you talking about?
 
  • #20
FlexGunship
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  • #21
@Mugaliens: Hey buddy, since no one else is throwing you a bone here (well... you got a puppy), allow me: the question I believe was along the lines of,

"I realize that I could live many lifetimes and die from bees and lightning before a satellite decays in orbit and falls, killing me. Your point then, which is that you shouldn't be afraid of risk that is beyond your control and minimal, stands... nonetheless, is it true that SOME people may die from a falling satellite, or is that purely mythical even as a possibility?"

OK, now, I might be uh... adding a bit here and there, but I'm pretty sure that was how the question was meant. I can understand however, why you'd think someone just missed your point entirely; the internet can be very fickle with subtleties of communication. If you're under a bit of extrea stress... well... it just gets worse.

Anyway, I could be wrong on all counts, but... this isn't like you mug! You're a calm guy who makes your case, not a hot-head.
 
  • #22
BobG
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nismaratwork;3112763nonetheless said:
It's highly unlikely anyone would be killed by a falling satellite. Satellites aren't designed to survive reentry. They break up and burn up. However, Delta 2 rocket booster fuel tanks are notorious for surviving reentry.
http://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/photogallery/gallarypage/deltaInTexas.jpg
http://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/photogallery/gallarypage/star48_3.jpg

Satellite reentries in general are off topic, anyway. However, the cool suggestion I e-mailed NASA about installing a device in the fuel tanks that is attracted to tin foil is relevant. Unfortunately, they never responded and the e-mails I've sent them as follow-ups have bounced back as unreceived. I guess they changed their e-mail address.

I kind of felt my suggestion would reduce mental illness in the world.
 
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  • #23
It's highly unlikely anyone would be killed by a falling satellite. Satellites aren't designed to survive reentry. They break up and burn up. However, Delta 2 rocket booster fuel tanks are notorious for surviving reentry.
http://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/photogallery/gallarypage/deltaInTexas.jpg
http://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/photogallery/gallarypage/star48_3.jpg

Satellite reentries in general are off topic, anyway. However, the cool suggestion I e-mailed NASA about installing a device in the fuel tanks that is attracted to tin foil is relevant. Unfortunately, they never responded and the e-mails I've sent them as follow-ups have bounced back as unreceived. I guess they changed their e-mail address.

I kind of felt my suggestion would reduce mental illness in the world.
OK... that wasn't actually something I'm asking, I was trying to explain what I believe EnumaElish was asking, and why it would be worth relaxing in terms of the severity of reaction. Of course, in theory a satellite or some other bit of "space junk" could kill someone, including a rocket booster, but I'd still worry more about that daily commute.

So, thanks for the sentiment, but I find that it helps to take posts in context, especially when the I was referring to an obvious dustup beginning with post #16.

edit: This is a good reason to properly quote.
 

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