Thermal Equilibirum Calorimeter

In summary, the problem involves a copper calorimeter with mass 0.100 kg containing 0.160 kg of water and 0.018 kg of ice in thermal equilibrium at atmospheric pressure. 0.750 kg of lead at a temperature of 255 degrees C is then added to the calorimeter, and the final temperature is unknown. The related formula for this problem is Q_1 + Q_2 + Q_3 = 0, where Q is equal to mcΔT and ΔT is the difference between the initial and final temperatures. Since the ice and water are in thermal equilibrium, the initial temperature is at the Triple point, which is 0.0098 degrees Celsius or 273.1598 Kelvin
  • #1
TFM
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Question

A copper calorimeter can with mass 0.100 kg contains 0.160 kg of water and 0.018 kg of ice in thermal equilibrium at atmospheric pressure.

If 0.750 kg of lead at a temperature of 255 degrees C is dropped into the calorimeter can, what is the final temperature? Assume that no heat is lost to the surroundings.

Related Formula

[tex] Q_1 + Q_2 + Q_3 = 0 [/tex]

[tex] Q = mc\Delta T [/tex]

[tex] \Delta T = T_{initial} - T_{final} [/tex]

The initial temperature of the Ice/Water/Container, so I am not quite sure what the best way to start this question is.

Any suggestions?

TFM
 
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  • #2
Please post your problems in the correct forum in future :grumpy:

As for your question, I offer you a hint: what is the temperature at which ice and water exists at thermal equilibrium?
 
  • #3
Sorry, I htought there was something different:blushing: Feel free to move to 'Homework and Coursework: Introductory Physics' Category.

Would this be at the Triple point, which I is 0.0098 degrees Celcius, 273.1598 Kelvin. This must be the intial Temperature?
 
  • #4
TFM said:
Would this be at the Triple point, which I is 0.0098 degrees Celcius, 273.1598 Kelvin. This must be the intial Temperature?
Correct! :approve:
 

What is a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter?

A Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter is a scientific device used to measure the heat exchanged between two substances or systems at thermal equilibrium. It is typically made up of a container, a thermometer, and a stirrer.

How does a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter work?

The Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter works by placing two substances or systems at different temperatures into the container, and then measuring the temperature change that occurs as they reach thermal equilibrium. This change in temperature is used to calculate the heat exchanged between the two substances or systems.

What are the applications of a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter?

A Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter is commonly used in chemistry and physics experiments to measure the heat of chemical reactions or physical processes. It is also used in industries such as food and beverage production to measure the calorie content of food and drinks.

What are the limitations of a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter?

One of the main limitations of a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter is that it assumes that the entire system is at thermal equilibrium, which may not always be the case. Other factors such as heat loss to the surroundings and the presence of heat sources or sinks within the system can also affect the accuracy of the measurements.

Can a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter be used to measure the specific heat capacity?

Yes, a Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeter can be used to measure the specific heat capacity of a substance. By measuring the amount of heat exchanged and the temperature change, the specific heat capacity can be calculated using the formula Q = mCΔT, where Q is the heat exchanged, m is the mass of the substance, C is the specific heat capacity, and ΔT is the temperature change.

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