Finding the Initial Temperature of Water in a Calorimeter: A Calorimetry Problem

In summary, the question is asking for the initial temperature of water in a calorimeter containing 300g of water and a 500g aluminum shot at 99°C, in order for the final temperature to be the same amount above the room temperature as the initial temperature was below the room temperature. The equation to use is (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of solid= (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of calorimeter + (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of water.
  • #1
annedi
16
1
please help :( I know the formula, but i don't understand the question1. Homework Statement
a 200g calorimeter, with heat capacity = 0.10 cal/g C, contains 300g of water. a 500 g aluminum shot, at 99 Celsius, was poured in the calorimeter. What would be the initial temperature of water in order that the final temperature will be as much above the room temperature as the initial temperature of water was below the room temperature

Homework Equations


(mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of solid= (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of calorimeter + (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of water
 
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  • #2
annedi said:
please help :( I know the formula, but i don't understand the question1. Homework Statement
a 200g calorimeter, with heat capacity = 0.10 cal/g C, contains 300g of water. a 500 g aluminum shot, at 99 Celsius, was poured in the calorimeter. What would be the initial temperature of water in order that the final temperature will be as much above the room temperature as the initial temperature of water was below the room temperature

Homework Equations


(mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of solid= (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of calorimeter + (mass)(heat capacity)(change in temp) of water
Let be the room temperature Tr and the initial temperature of water Ti, the final temperature of water Tf. The problem says that Tf-Tr=Tr-Ti.
 
  • #3
What is unclear?

As an example, if the room temperature is 20°C and your water and calorimeter would be at 5° C initially (15K below room temperature), then the final temperature of everything should be 35° C (15K above room temperature). This is not the solution as the energy does not match (I made up those numbers). You have to find the temperature where the numbers match.
 

Related to Finding the Initial Temperature of Water in a Calorimeter: A Calorimetry Problem

1. What is calorimetry?

Calorimetry is the science of measuring heat flow and changes in thermal energy in a system. It involves the use of a calorimeter, an instrument that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction or physical process.

2. How do you solve a calorimetry problem?

To solve a calorimetry problem, you need to follow these steps:

  • Identify the given information and the unknown quantity.
  • Determine the type of calorimetry problem (constant pressure or constant volume).
  • Apply the appropriate formula to calculate the heat exchanged.
  • Convert the units of the given and calculated values, if necessary.
  • Check the answer for reasonableness and accuracy.

3. What is the difference between constant pressure and constant volume calorimetry?

In constant pressure calorimetry, the pressure remains constant while the volume may change. This type of calorimetry is used for reactions that occur in open containers. In contrast, constant volume calorimetry involves keeping the volume constant while the pressure may change. This is used for reactions that occur in closed containers.

4. Can you explain the specific heat capacity and its role in calorimetry?

Specific heat capacity is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of a substance by 1 degree Celsius. It is an important factor in calorimetry as it determines the amount of heat absorbed or released by a substance. The higher the specific heat capacity, the more energy is required to change the temperature, and vice versa.

5. What are some common sources of error in calorimetry experiments?

Some common sources of error in calorimetry experiments include heat loss to the surroundings, incomplete mixing of reactants, and heat transfer between the calorimeter and the reaction vessel. Other factors such as human error in measurement or calculation, instrumental errors, and uncertainty in the specific heat capacity of a substance can also contribute to inaccuracies in the results.

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