Thermodynamics: Finding Specific Heat of Ice

In summary, thermodynamics is the study of heat and its relation to other forms of energy. Specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of a substance by 1 degree Celsius. To find the specific heat of ice, the mass and initial temperature of the ice must be measured, heat must be added until it melts, and the final temperature must be measured. Finding the specific heat of ice is important in understanding the energy needed to change its temperature and has practical applications. Factors such as impurities, pressure, and heat transfer rate can affect the specific heat of ice, making it important to carefully control experimental conditions.
  • #1
swede5670
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Homework Statement


It takes 15 seconds to warm ice 15 degrees ( -15 degrees celsius to 0 degrees celsius). The ice has a mass of .25 kg. The energy is supplied at 530 W to the ice.

Homework Equations


Q = mc delta T


The Attempt at a Solution


I plugged in all the information for Q
(15 seconds * 530 W) = .25 * c * 15 degrees
which ends up with c = 2120

Did I do this correctly
 
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  • #2
You might want to add some units - but correct method
 
  • #3
?

I cannot provide direct answers to homework questions. However, I can offer guidance on how to approach this problem and check your solution.

First, let's review the concept of specific heat. Specific heat is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of a substance by 1 degree Celsius. In this problem, we are dealing with a mass of 0.25 kg, so we need to convert the specific heat to units of joules per kilogram per degree Celsius (J/kg°C).

Next, let's review the equation you used: Q = mc∆T. This equation represents the amount of heat (Q) needed to change the temperature of a substance by a certain amount (m∆T), where m is the mass of the substance and c is the specific heat.

Now, let's plug in the given information into this equation. We know that the change in temperature (∆T) is 15 degrees Celsius, the mass (m) is 0.25 kg, and the energy supplied (Q) is 530 W for 15 seconds. However, we need to convert the energy from watts (W) to joules (J). This can be done by multiplying the power (530 W) by the time (15 seconds).

After converting the units, we can solve for c by dividing both sides of the equation by (m∆T). This should give you a value of 2100 J/kg°C for the specific heat of ice.

To check your solution, you can also use the equation for power (P = Q/t) to see if the calculated energy (Q) matches the given power and time. If it does, then your solution is likely correct.

In conclusion, it seems that your calculation is close to the correct answer. However, make sure to check your units and use the correct values in the equation. Also, double-check your calculations to ensure accuracy. As a scientist, it is important to always double-check and verify our work to ensure accuracy and avoid errors.
 

1. What is thermodynamics?

Thermodynamics is the branch of science that deals with the study of heat and its relation to other forms of energy, such as work and temperature.

2. What is specific heat?

Specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of a substance by 1 degree Celsius.

3. How do you find the specific heat of ice?

To find the specific heat of ice, you need to measure the mass and initial temperature of the ice, add heat to the ice until it melts, and then measure the final temperature. The specific heat can then be calculated using the formula q = m * c * ΔT, where q is the heat added, m is the mass of the ice, c is the specific heat of ice, and ΔT is the change in temperature.

4. Why is finding the specific heat of ice important?

Finding the specific heat of ice is important because it helps us understand the energy needed to change the temperature of ice. This information is useful in many practical applications, such as designing refrigeration systems or understanding climate change.

5. Are there any factors that can affect the specific heat of ice?

Yes, there are several factors that can affect the specific heat of ice, including impurities in the ice, pressure, and the rate at which heat is added or removed from the ice. These factors can alter the amount of energy needed to change the temperature of ice, making it important to carefully control experimental conditions when finding the specific heat of ice.

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