Torque Transfer Through Linkages/Arms

  • Thread starter Bisher Deirki
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    Torque
In summary, the task at hand is to determine the amount of force needed to lift the spill door using a screwjack/motor. The formula used is T=F*d, with the weight of the door as the force and the vertical distance between Linkage 1 and 4 as the distance. The diagram is unclear, but it is assumed that there is no resistance or friction between the linkages. The 250N weight of the door is shown as an upward force, indicating the force needed to raise it.
  • #1
Bisher Deirki
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Homework Statement


Find out the amount of force exerted by the screwjack/motor to lift the spill door upwards. The length of the different linkages is known as well as an estimate of the weight of the spill door.

Homework Equations


Torque = Force x Distance

The Attempt at a Solution


All I could think of doing is use the formula T= F*d; using the weight of the spill door as the Force required while the distance is simply the vertical distance between Linkage 1 and 4 - thus ignoring the horizontal linkages. Is this a good/correct approximation? Please let me know or point me towards a correct solution/theory to solve this. Assuming there is no resistance/friction between the different linkages.
 

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  • #2
I'm having trouble understanding the diagram. The rod at the top is called a screwjack, which implies it rotates about its own long axis and has a thread along it. But it does not appear to engage a thread at the left hand end. It looks more like a simple rod (but then, rotating about what axis?).
The large disc at the bottom of the V looks like it might be a pivot on a fixed axis normal to the page. The other discs just axle joints, free to move around.
The 250N is described as the weight of the spill door, but it is shown as an upward force. I guess that is supposed to indicate the force exerted on the spill door to raise it.
 

Related to Torque Transfer Through Linkages/Arms

1. What is torque transfer through linkages/arms?

Torque transfer through linkages/arms refers to the transfer of rotational force, or torque, from one point to another through a series of interconnected links or arms. This mechanism is commonly used in machines and mechanical systems to transmit power and motion.

2. How do linkages/arms transfer torque?

Linkages/arms transfer torque through a combination of rigid connections and leverage. When a force is applied at one end of the linkage/arm, it creates a rotational force that is transferred through the links/arms to the other end.

3. What are the types of linkages/arms used for torque transfer?

There are several types of linkages/arms that can be used for torque transfer, including crank and rocker mechanisms, scissor mechanisms, and four-bar linkages. Each type has its own advantages and is used in different applications depending on the desired movement and force required.

4. What factors affect torque transfer through linkages/arms?

The main factors that affect torque transfer through linkages/arms include the length and angles of the links/arms, the force applied, and the load or resistance at the end of the linkage/arm. The design of the linkage/arm system also plays a crucial role in determining its efficiency and ability to transfer torque.

5. What are the applications of torque transfer through linkages/arms?

Torque transfer through linkages/arms is used in a wide range of applications, including steering systems in vehicles, robotic arms, lawn mowers, and even in human prosthetics. It is also commonly used in industrial machinery, such as presses and conveyors, to transfer power and motion between different components.

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