Transceiver, near field, very low cost

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In summary, there are many sources for near field transceivers and ultra simple or basic tank transmitters and receivers, such as Amtel, Microchip, NST, Analog Devices, and TI. However, the costs for these solutions range from USD0.50 to 2.00 per transceiver without any interface. The desired solution would have a cost target of approximately $0.20 per data-only transceiver, with additional costs for interfacing to other circuits. The goal is to have a battery-powered transceiver with a very low data rate, a range of 3 meters, and an overall size of a U.S. quarter. A stretch goal is to have a three-channel capability, with each transceiver tuned to a
  • #1
RCAircraft
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Internet research shows many sources for near field transceivers and ultra simple or basic tank transmitters and tank receivers.

Amtel, Microchip, NST, Analog Devices, TI and others offer near field solutions however costs are in the USD0.50 - 2.00 range per transceiver without any interface.

I am seeking a solution for a cost target of approximately $0.20 per data only transceiver. Interfacing costs to other circuits would be additional costs.

Interfacing could be a simple JFET or whatever controlling device to pull down/up an input to a uP.

These costs are for quantities of 15,000 transceivers by 4th quarter 2009. Quantites could grow to +500,000 annually by 4th quarter 2011.

Basic goals: battery powered (1.5 - 3VDC and 5mA or less current) very low data rate transceiver with a range of approximately 3 meters (about 10 feet).

Overall size target is approximately the size of a U.S. quarter.

A stretch goal is to have "three channel" capability - if component costs allow there could be one transceiver per channel.

Basically capable of transmitting a short "hello" data burst each second to be picked up by the receiving transceiver. Each transceiver would be tuned to a specific receiving and transmitting frequency.

Durability of the transceiver - very short life - 200 operations maximum then discarded (properly). Low cost circuit board - perhaps printed on label stock with conductive ink or resist PCB if cost are lower.

AM or FM okay - direction driven by costs.

FCC issues would be addressed with a solution if necessary.

It would be nice to design/develop such a solution however locating a capable supplier would be much better.

Your comments are welcomed including if I need to do it myself! Thank you.
 
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  • #2
After the cost of the battery, how of the $0.20 would be left for the cost of the transceiver?
 
  • #3
The battery cost is not included within the $0.20 cost target.
Thank you.
 

Related to Transceiver, near field, very low cost

1. What is a transceiver?

A transceiver is a device that can both transmit and receive signals, allowing for two-way communication. It combines a transmitter and receiver into a single unit, making it more efficient and cost-effective.

2. What is the significance of "near field" in a transceiver?

The term "near field" refers to the proximity of the communication range between the transceiver and the device it is communicating with. In a near field transceiver, this range is typically within a few centimeters, making it ideal for short-range communication such as in RFID technology.

3. How is a "very low cost" transceiver different from other transceivers?

A "very low cost" transceiver typically uses cheaper components and has a simpler design compared to other transceivers. This allows for a lower production cost, making it more affordable for mass production and use in applications where cost is a significant factor.

4. What are some common uses for a "very low cost" transceiver?

"Very low cost" transceivers are commonly used in applications where short-range communication is needed, such as in RFID tags, wireless sensor networks, and smart home devices. They are also used in low-cost communication devices such as walkie-talkies and baby monitors.

5. Are there any limitations to using a "very low cost" transceiver?

One limitation of using a "very low cost" transceiver is its shorter communication range compared to other transceivers. It is also more susceptible to interference and may have lower data transfer rates. However, for its intended applications, these limitations are not significant and are outweighed by its low cost.

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