Transfer to chemical engineering from BS in chemistry?

In summary, the speaker is an undergraduate student studying for a BS in chemistry with a minor in pre-pharmacy. They have taken courses in anatomy and organic chemistry and enjoy the problem-solving aspect of organic chemistry. However, they find lab work less enjoyable due to shaky hands and a dislike for following procedures. After researching job markets, they are considering transferring to a chemical engineering degree to increase job prospects, but this would add two extra semesters and more debt. The speaker is primarily looking for a degree with a good job outlook and a salary of at least 40k after graduation. They also have hobbies in drawing, web design, and programming. The speaker prioritizes enjoying what they are doing and is unsure about the job prospects in bioengineering
  • #1
worryingchem
41
1
Hi.
I'm currently an undergraduate student studying for a BS in chemistry and doing pre-pharm courses (I wanted backup career). I've taken anatomy and orgo lectures and labs. What I enjoy from orgo class was that they give you a start and an end, you fill in the rest. I like problems that are like puzzles where you use logic to solve them. I also enjoy solving math problems since they are logical. Orgo lab was less enjoyable because I get bore looking at procedures and doing them. Also, because I have shaky hands, it was annoying to do things like massing or using a pipette.

I've been looking at forums and seeing that the job markets for pharmacist and BS in chemistry are getting worse.
So I wanted to know if I should transfer to a chemistry engineering degree. Strictly speaking, I only want to get Bachelor degree right now, without going to graduate school (college debts pretty much won't let me).

If I do transfer to chemical engineering, then it will add 2 extra semesters to my expected graduation date along with (+10k-15k of debt).

The things I want from my degree are

-good job outlook being the most important
-prefer a salary of 40k+ after graduating.

Personal hobby: drawing, web design, and programming.
 
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  • #2
Where does "enjoying what you are doing" fit in on your list of priorities?

You haven't said anything about the possibility of bio engineering.

Chet
 
  • #3
I mainly enjoy solving logical problems. For example, I can sit around solving math problems for hours without losing much focus if given the time. So that's why I had an interest in science, but I also want a degree that will lessen my worry of not being able to find a job.
 
  • #4
I also looked at bio engineering, but not certain about job prospect.
 
  • #5


I understand your concerns about the job market for pharmacists and BS in chemistry graduates. It is always wise to consider the job outlook and potential salary when making decisions about your education and career path. However, I would caution against making a decision solely based on these factors.

Firstly, it is important to consider whether or not chemical engineering is a field that truly interests you. While there may be a higher demand for chemical engineers and potentially higher salaries, if you do not enjoy the subject matter, you may not be happy in your career. It is important to find a balance between a job that is in demand and one that you are passionate about.

Secondly, transferring to a chemical engineering degree will add two extra semesters to your expected graduation date and increase your debt. You should carefully consider whether the potential benefits outweigh the additional time and financial investment. It may be worth speaking with a career counselor or academic advisor to explore other options, such as graduate school or internships, that may help you achieve your career goals without adding extra time and debt.

Lastly, I would encourage you to consider your personal hobbies and interests when making this decision. While they may not directly relate to your degree, they can provide valuable skills and experiences that can make you a well-rounded and attractive candidate to potential employers.

In summary, while job outlook and salary are important factors to consider, I would advise you to also consider your interests and long-term goals before making a decision to transfer to chemical engineering. It is important to find a career path that fulfills you both professionally and personally.
 

What is the difference between chemical engineering and chemistry?

Chemical engineering is a branch of engineering that focuses on the design, development, and production of chemical processes and products. Chemistry, on the other hand, is a branch of science that focuses on the study of matter, its properties, and its transformations. While both fields involve the study of chemicals and their reactions, chemical engineering applies this knowledge to practical applications and the production of useful products.

What skills do I need to have to transfer from a BS in chemistry to chemical engineering?

To successfully transfer from a BS in chemistry to chemical engineering, you will need a strong background in math, physics, and chemistry. It is also beneficial to have good problem-solving skills, critical thinking abilities, and strong communication skills. Additionally, proficiency in computer programming and laboratory techniques are important skills for chemical engineers.

How do I know if chemical engineering is the right career path for me?

If you are considering transferring from a BS in chemistry to chemical engineering, it is important to research and understand the career path and day-to-day responsibilities of a chemical engineer. You can also talk to current chemical engineering students or professionals to get a better understanding of the field. Additionally, taking courses or participating in internships related to chemical engineering can help you determine if it is the right fit for you.

Will my BS in chemistry credits transfer to a chemical engineering program?

This will depend on the specific requirements of the chemical engineering program you are transferring to. Some courses, such as math and science courses, are likely to transfer, but some core chemical engineering courses may not. It is important to check with the program and your academic advisor to determine which courses will transfer and if any additional coursework is needed.

What career opportunities are available for chemical engineers?

Chemical engineers have a wide range of career opportunities in industries such as pharmaceuticals, energy, food and beverage, and materials development. They can work in research and development, process design and optimization, production, quality control, and more. Additionally, chemical engineers can also choose to pursue advanced degrees and work in academia or research institutions.

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