Two Quick Questions Regarding Lasers - I hope this is the right place to ask

  • Thread starter Umbra Lupis
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In summary, in a math class, the speaker was given an assignment to model lasers and provided with equations and defined terms. They are unsure about the terms "Mirror Transmission" and "Pump Strength" and are seeking help in defining them. The equations given are: dn/dt = GnN - kn and dN/dt = -fN - GnN + P. Mirror transmission refers to the probability of a photon exiting the laser when hitting a mirror, while pump strength is the rate at which the pump excites the atoms. It can also be thought of as the percentage of power transmitted by the mirror.
  • #1
Umbra Lupis
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In my math class we were given an assignment to model lasers, we have been given equations, and terms have been somewhat defined, but I do not know what the following terms are when relating to a laser. Any help in defining them would be awesome!

What is:

Mirror Transmission,

Pump Strength?

Thanks for your time and any help you can provide!

PS:
For those interested the equations given were:

dn/dt = GnN - kn
dN/dt = -fN - GnN + P

Where n is the number of photons, N is the number of excited atoms, G > 0 is the
gain coefficient for stimulated emission, k > 0 is the decay rate due to loss of photons by mirror transmission, scattering, etc., f > 0 is the decay rate for spontaneous emission, and P is the pump strength.
 
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  • #2
Mirror transmission is the probably the probability that a photon will exit the laser when it hits the mirror. Pump strength is probably the rate at which the pump excites the atoms. I am just using your equations to make these guesses.
 
  • #3
turin is correct. You can also think of mirror transmission as the percentage of power in an incident wave that is transmitted (vs. being reflected) by the mirror.
 
  • #4
Thanks guys!
 

Related to Two Quick Questions Regarding Lasers - I hope this is the right place to ask

1. How do lasers work?

Lasers work by stimulating atoms or molecules to release photons, which are particles of light. This process is called stimulated emission and it produces a beam of coherent light. The light is then amplified and directed by mirrors or lenses to create a powerful and focused beam.

2. What are the different types of lasers?

There are several different types of lasers, including gas lasers, solid-state lasers, and semiconductor lasers. Gas lasers use a gas mixture as the medium for producing light, while solid-state lasers use a solid material such as a crystal or glass. Semiconductor lasers, also known as diode lasers, use a semiconductor as the medium and are commonly used in consumer electronics such as DVD players and laser pointers.

3. What are the applications of lasers?

Lasers have a wide range of applications in various fields. Some common uses include cutting, welding, and drilling in industrial settings, medical procedures such as eye surgery, and communication technologies such as fiber optics. They are also used in scientific research, military weapons, and entertainment such as laser light shows.

4. Are lasers harmful to humans?

The majority of lasers used in everyday applications, such as laser pointers and barcode scanners, are not harmful to humans. However, high-powered lasers used in industrial or medical settings can be dangerous if not used properly. Exposure to laser light can cause burns, eye damage, and can even be fatal in extreme cases. It is important to always follow safety guidelines when working with lasers.

5. Can lasers travel through a vacuum?

Yes, lasers can travel through a vacuum because they do not require a medium to propagate. This is one of the unique properties of light that makes lasers useful in space exploration and communication. However, the intensity of the laser beam may decrease over long distances due to factors such as diffraction and absorption.

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