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Ultimate stress vs Temperature in glass

  1. Feb 1, 2015 #1
    Hello all,
    I've got stuck with building a test rig for my PhD. I'd like to design a pressurised chamber with a window on. The temperature of the chamber and window will rise up to 500-600 C deg. I can calculate the stress in the window but I can not find any info on the ultimate tensile/compressive stress of glass (quartz, fused silica, borosilicate or soda lime) as function of temperature anywhere.

    I'm getting desperate! Is there anyone out there who knows the book or paper that has the curve in it? Please!!!

    The net and the databases are full up with info on metals, I attached an example for aluminium, I need a similar chart for glass.

    Thanks very much,
    Alex Al temp.png
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2015 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    Glass has a ridiculously high ultimate strength on the order of 2 million psi in USA units.....IF perfect. But glass has microscopic cracks and notch flaws in the manufacturing process, reducing its actual tensile strength by a factor of 100 or more. But whatever it is, there is little reduction in its strength at high temperatures...might even get a bit stronger if anything. Caution on differential pressure...you don't see pressurized airplanes using glass windows with high pressure differences at high altitudes. But I am certainly no expert on this, it is my best understanding.
     
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