Understanding Electromagnetic Induction: Flux and Induced e.m.f.

In summary, when studying electromagnetic induction, it is important to understand that the flux is greatest when the angle between the conductor and magnetic field is 90 degrees due to the area through which flux lines pass. Additionally, the induced e.m.f opposes the change that induces it by creating a current with a magnetic field in the opposite direction, often referred to as the Lorentz force.
  • #1
accountdracula
21
0
Warning: Formatting template must be used in the Homework sections of PF!
I'm studying electromagnetic induction and I'm trying to understand a couple of things:
Why is the flux greatest when the angle between the conductor and magnetic field is 90 degrees?
How does the induced e.m.f oppose the change which induces it?
My thoughts:
The flux is greatest when the angle between the conductor and magnetic field is 90 degrees because there is the greatest magnetic flux density within the coil when this condition is met. Is this correct and is this the only reason?

Induced e.m.f creates a current which has a magnetic field around it which is in the direction opposite to that of the magnetic field which induces the e.m.f, thus cancelling it out. Again, is this right?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
accountdracula said:
I'm studying electromagnetic induction and I'm trying to understand a couple of things:
Why is the flux greatest when the angle between the conductor and magnetic field is 90 degrees?
How does the induced e.m.f oppose the change which induces it?
My thoughts:
The flux is greatest when the angle between the conductor and magnetic field is 90 degrees because there is the greatest magnetic flux density within the coil when this condition is met. Is this correct and is this the only reason?

Induced e.m.f creates a current which has a magnetic field around it which is in the direction opposite to that of the magnetic field which induces the e.m.f, thus cancelling it out. Again, is this right?
(1) Not so much the flux density as the area through which flux lines pass
(2) Yes. Whether it cancels is to be seen, but it surely opposes.
All to do with the Lorentz force (which google).
 

Related to Understanding Electromagnetic Induction: Flux and Induced e.m.f.

1. What is electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction is the process of creating an electric current in a conductor by changing the magnetic field around it.

2. How does electromagnetic induction work?

Electromagnetic induction works through Faraday's law, which states that a changing magnetic field will induce an electric current in a conductor. This can be achieved by moving a magnet near a conductor or by changing the current in a nearby conductor.

3. What are some real-life applications of electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction is used in many everyday devices such as generators, transformers, and electric motors. It is also used in wireless charging, induction cooktops, and metal detectors.

4. How does electromagnetic induction relate to electricity and magnetism?

Electromagnetic induction is a phenomenon that connects electricity and magnetism. It explains how a changing magnetic field can create an electric current and vice versa. This relationship is described by Maxwell's equations.

5. What are some factors that affect the strength of electromagnetic induction?

The strength of electromagnetic induction depends on factors such as the speed of the movement of the magnet or conductor, the strength of the magnetic field, and the distance between the magnet and conductor. It also depends on the material of the conductor and the frequency of the changing magnetic field.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
0
Views
129
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
838
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
207
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
280
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
183
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
337
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
801
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
952
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
Back
Top