Understanding the Doppler Effect: Using c-v0, c+v0, c+Vs, c-Vs

In summary, the Doppler effect is the change in frequency of a wave when the source or observer is in motion. Depending on the direction of motion, the frequency can increase or decrease, resulting in positive or negative values for velocity. The formula for calculating this effect takes into account the relative velocities of the source and observer.
  • #1
k121212
2
0
can someone pleasezz explain the dopplers effect

n when to use the c-v0 , c+v0 ,c +Vs ,c-Vs
:yuck:
etc etc in the formula in the pic


thnx a lot in advance
 

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  • #2
k121212 said:
can someone pleasezz explain the dopplers effect

n when to use the c-v0 , c+v0 ,c +Vs ,c-Vs
:yuck:
etc etc in the formula in the pic


thnx a lot in advance
When in doubt, think about only one velocity being other than zero. Source moving away, frequency drops- positive. Source moving toward you, frequency rises- negative, You move toward source, frequency rises- positive. You move away from source, frequency drops- negative.
 

What is the Doppler Effect?

The Doppler Effect is the change in frequency or wavelength of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to the wave source.

How is the Doppler Effect related to the speed of sound?

The Doppler Effect is commonly observed with sound waves, where an observer moving towards a sound source will perceive a higher frequency (and shorter wavelength) of the sound, while an observer moving away from the sound source will perceive a lower frequency (and longer wavelength).

What is the formula for calculating the Doppler Effect?

The formula for calculating the Doppler Effect is: f' = f (c +/- v0) / (c +/- vs), where f' is the perceived frequency, f is the actual frequency, c is the speed of the wave, v0 is the velocity of the observer, and vs is the velocity of the wave source.

How does the Doppler Effect apply to light waves?

The Doppler Effect also applies to light waves, where an observer moving towards a light source will perceive a higher frequency (and shorter wavelength) of the light, while an observer moving away from the light source will perceive a lower frequency (and longer wavelength). This is commonly observed with astronomical objects, such as stars and galaxies, and is used to determine their relative motion.

What are some practical applications of the Doppler Effect?

The Doppler Effect has various practical applications, including in radar systems, where it is used to determine the speed and direction of moving objects. It is also used in medical imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, to measure blood flow and detect abnormalities. Additionally, it is used in astronomy to study the motion and properties of celestial objects.

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