University Physics textbook topics

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Does anyone have the latest University Physics (Young) textbook and know if there is a discussion of "jerk" in it? THanks, JP
 

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berkeman
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Does anyone have the latest University Physics (Young) textbook and know if there is a discussion of "jerk" in it? THanks, JP
Welcome to the PF. :smile:

If you go to Amazon's book section and search on the book, often you can "Look Inside" at the Table of Contents and other places. Have you tried that yet?
 
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George Jones
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Does anyone have the latest University Physics (Young) textbook and know if there is a discussion of "jerk" in it? THanks, JP
If you go to Amazon's book section and search on the book, often you can "Look Inside" at the Table of Contents and other places. Have you tried that yet?
Using "Look Inside", I see that jerk is not in the index. This topic usually isn't discussed, .e.g., I just pulled (at random) a couple of other first-year texts off my shelf, I don't see it either of them.

I have a friend, a retired teacher, who wears a t-shirt that says "Don't be a ##\frac{d^3 x}{dt^3}##." I suppose one has to be a bit geeky to understand this.
 
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Thanks guys. Yes I did look at an on-line version of the books' TOC. And I did not find jerk. I could not find an index, so thanks for that info Mr. Jones. I did see mention of jerk in the synopsis for another book but as you say, it was VERY limited.

I was afraid this would be the answer.
 
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vanhees71
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The only question is for what "jerk", i.e., ##\dot{\vec{a}}## is good for. The only place in physics I ever got this quantity is in the notorious problem to describe radiation reaction to classical point particles, and there it makes a lot of trouble, which is resolved by making another approximation to eliminate it (i.e., going from the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equation which is flawed due to the fact that classical point particles make no sense and don't exist in a naive way, to the Landau-Lifshitz equation, which at least has less flaws). This stuff is, however, way beyond the level of this introductory textbook.
 
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Right. The one book (forgot the title) I saw "jerk" in, said the same thing; 'not used for much in physics.'
I have the 6th edition of University Physics and was thinking of updating to the newest one.
Wondered if they expanded scope to at least introduce things like this.
thanks guys
 

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