Unmatched voltages on a transformer's primary coils

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In summary, a transformer will convert the power from one voltage to another. The two coils on the transformer will produce different voltages and currents. If the two coils are of the same size and number of windings, then the two generators will add together and create a higher output voltage. If the two generators are of different sizes and number of windings, then the two generators will subtract from each other and the output voltage will be lower.
  • #36
1) does Ohm's law apply here? as in...will the circuit actually have 25A runinng through it?
yes ohms law still applies, and that depends ..if the internal resistance of the generator is low enough, and the generator does not slow down ie. is still producing 50V then yes it could produce 25 A.
2) and what if the generator can't supply that much mechanical power to be converted? (i'm going to assume that the voltage would simply drop until both values were optimal, i'd just like to know whether I am right or wrong on that)
a generator does not supply mechanical power , a generator uses mechanical power to produce electrical power..if the mechanical power supplied to the generator can't keep up , the generator will slow down ,then the voltage will drop yes, ..
ps a load of 2 ohms is not a short to ground ,it is a load of 2 ohms..
 
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  • #37
infamous_Q said:
ok thanks...guess what though, i have another question for you helpful people.

is it correct that emf produced in a coil is proportional to (or the equation is...):
emf = 2pi * number of coils * magnetic field coil is in * frequency coil's turning at * surface area of the coil

so is this true or not?
 
  • #38
I ask you a followup question to your question - what units is the EMF measured in? How does that relate to the voltage and current output the unit can produce?

In short, the alternator/generator needs more than a simple calc on how it should be wound as the RPM it will be operated at and factors like the inductance/capacitance/conductivity (current capacity, inverse of resistance) need to be balanced as well as the cost and method of construction.

If you can't find what you want in a commerically available generator you are going to need to know an incredible amount more information in order to build one and impressive equipment to create it with tolerances of similar proportion.

On a personal note, you need to look at it this way: If the current efficiency is 85% then the most you could ever hope to achieve is increasing it to closer to 100%. Science is not foolish enough to overlook alternative energy sources, there are many threads on that topic alone in other forums. The big question is cost and practicality. Any person with sufficient funds can have a solar, wind, hydro, maybe goethermal or other source of power for all their energy needs depending on their location. But at best they cost twice as much as burning the stuff from the ground and require big bucks to get started. It should be obvious why it hasn't caught on.
 

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