Upper Level EE Courses: Digital Systems for a Job at Microsoft, Intel, IBM, AMD

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In summary, it doesn't matter which upper level course you take next year, when you're a senior. You'll be able to get a job in any of the fields that the courses you're interested in cover.
  • #1
HD555
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Does it matter which upper level course I take next year, when I'm a senior? I'm an EE major. The courses that I have narrowed it down to incude:

  • Digital Communications Theory
  • Analog Circuit Design and Implementation
  • Electro-Optic Theory
  • Digital Systems Design II
  • CMOS VLSI
  • Digital Control Systems

After I graduate, I hope to get a job at a company like Microsoft, Intel, IBM, AMD, etc... would any of these course help me towards getting into that company? I know the exact position would vary upon what job needs to be done, as all of the courses above are important... My question is geared toward which would be the best for a fundamental course? Something to have a good background in...
 
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  • #2
HD555 said:
Does it matter which upper level course I take next year, when I'm a senior? I'm an EE major. The courses that I have narrowed it down to incude:

  • Digital Communications Theory
  • Analog Circuit Design and Implementation
  • Electro-Optic Theory
  • Digital Systems Design II
  • CMOS VLSI
  • Digital Control Systems

After I graduate, I hope to get a job at a company like Microsoft, Intel, IBM, AMD, etc... would any of these course help me towards getting into that company? I know the exact position would vary upon what job needs to be done, as all of the courses above are important... My question is geared toward which would be the best for a fundamental course? Something to have a good background in...


Microsoft is a software company. What field do you want to specialize in?
 
  • #3
Optoelectronics is fun...
 
  • #4
berkeman said:
Microsoft is a software company. What field do you want to specialize in?

I was hoping to get into their hardware-related products.

As far as specializing, I don't really have a preference. I've always enjoyed communications and signal processing. I might venture into the VLSI world, since I enjoyed my semiconductors course a lot, so that's an option too.

I can tell you what I'm not interested in... these are the fields in its purest sense... as in, I wouldn't mind doing these when it needs to be done, however I don't want to be someone who specializes in it and is the "go to" guy. And they are... control systems, power distribution, power electronics, and that's it I think.
 

1. What are "Upper Level EE Courses"?

"Upper Level EE Courses" refer to advanced courses in Electrical Engineering that are typically taken in the latter part of a student's undergraduate or graduate studies. These courses build upon the foundational knowledge gained in lower level courses and delve into more specialized topics.

2. What topics are covered in Digital Systems courses?

Digital Systems courses cover a range of topics related to the design and analysis of digital systems. This can include Boolean algebra, logic gates, VHDL programming, sequential and combinational logic, microprocessors, and memory systems.

3. How do these courses prepare students for a job at Microsoft, Intel, IBM, or AMD?

These courses provide students with a strong understanding of digital systems, which is a key skill required for many jobs at these tech companies. The courses also often involve hands-on projects and assignments that give students practical experience and prepare them for the types of tasks they may encounter in a job at one of these companies.

4. Are there any specific skills or tools that students will learn in these courses?

Yes, students will learn how to use various tools and software commonly used in the industry such as logic analyzers, FPGA design software, and hardware description languages like VHDL. They will also gain skills in problem-solving, critical thinking, and teamwork, which are important for any job in the tech industry.

5. Are these courses only relevant for students pursuing a career in electrical engineering?

No, these courses can be beneficial for students pursuing a variety of careers in the tech industry. Many companies, not just those in the electrical engineering field, use digital systems in their products and services. Therefore, having a strong understanding of these systems can be advantageous for a variety of roles such as software engineering, product design, and project management.

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