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Vapor from high-energy particle collisions?

  1. Mar 21, 2010 #1
    Hello,

    With laser cooling experiments it is possible to create Bose–Einstein condensate. Is there also vapor produced during high-energy particle collisions? And if so, what kind of gasses are it?

    michel
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 21, 2010 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    No, the collisions happen in a vacuum.
     
  4. Mar 21, 2010 #3
    Is that relevant? I thought that Bose-Einstein Condensate was generated in a vacuum:
    And if not in a vacuum, would there be a vapor produced?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Mar 21, 2010 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    No, like I said, there is no vapor produced. If there were, it wouldn't be a vacuum any more.
     
  6. Mar 21, 2010 #5
    You said the collisions happen in a vacuum, logically if there is a gas produced it wouldn't be a vacuum no more. Isn't this what experimenting is about, like the Bose-Einstein Condensate experiment creates a vapor in a vacuum environment.
     
  7. Mar 21, 2010 #6

    Vanadium 50

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    Chelle, there is a limit to how often I will repeat myself. Your question has a simple yes-no answer, and the answer is no.
     
  8. Mar 21, 2010 #7
    Ok, could you perhaps help me out why there is vapor generated during the Bose-Einstein Condensate experiment in a vacuum, and none during the particle collisions in a vacuum.
     
  9. Mar 21, 2010 #8
    thx Bob, I don't know why you removed your comment?

    Anyway I was basicly interested in what gassed cosmic-ray particles bombarding the moon could produce, perhaps radon? And if it could be related to the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient_lunar_phenomenon" [Broken]?
     
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  10. Mar 27, 2010 #9

    Redbelly98

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    Allow me to clarify that these are two separate, completely unrelated questions.

    Laser cooling is used as a starting step to get to a Bose-Einstein condensate. The actual BEC is produced by a final evaporative cooling process; laser cooling alone has never created BEC.

    High-energy particle collisions, as produced in a particle accelerator, produce fundamental particles but they do not produce entire atoms or molecules as would be required to create a vapor.
     
  11. Mar 27, 2010 #10
    I had only one question, asking if there would be a gas similarly like the one that can produce BEC. Like it says on the wiki page of Bose-Gas, it isn't made of atoms or molecules but subatomic particles, bosons:
     
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  12. Mar 28, 2010 #11
    I guess we can all learn something.

    Btw I don't understand why my question has been moved over here since it was about particle physics.

    Anyway check this article out:
     
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  13. Mar 28, 2010 #12

    Redbelly98

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    You're right, I misread your initial statement about laser cooling to be a question. I agree that the answer is no. The particles in a quark-gluon plasma behave quite differently than atoms.
    It does not say that bosons are necessarily subatomic in that quote. Bosons can be atoms. In fact the BEC work with laser-cooled atoms does use complete atoms, not subatomic particles.

    Okay, they're using "gas" to mean a collection of particles that are not bound together in a condensed state. More specifically, the quarks would not be bound together to form protons or neutrons. At least that is one thing they will be looking for at the LHC, it has not yet been observed.
     
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  14. Mar 28, 2010 #13
    Atoms are used to detect the vapor, a new phase of matter. I guess if it would have been made out of atoms they wouldn't call it Bose-gas, check the text under the image on the wiki page:

    and

    I'm curious what sort of gas/vapor they are hoping to find, and if it also would bang like a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bosenova" [Broken] ^_^
     
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  15. Mar 28, 2010 #14

    Redbelly98

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    No. The rubidium atoms *are* the Bose condensate.
     
  16. Mar 29, 2010 #15
    No. In the case of "ice" you can say it is "water" because it are water-molecules, but in this case the composition of the atoms is changed into something new; Bose-Einstein Condensate, made out of bosons.

     
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