Variable Pressure: Is Piston Pump the Answer?

In summary: What are the flow rates and pressures?The flow rates are in the range of 0.01 to 0.09 ml/min. The pressure is needed to be consistent, so it is not defined.
  • #1
banerjeerupak
123
1
I need to introduce variable pressure into a system. I was planning on using piston pumps which if i run at low rpms would result in controlled fluctuating pressures. Am i doing something wrong?
 
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  • #2
We need an awful lot more information about the system and its requirements. Do you have a diagram? What is the purpose? What are the flow rates and pressures? What design constraints do you have? Why are you using a piston pump?
 
  • #3
I am working on an experiment where i would like to see how the system responds to pressure fluctuations.

I tried using a stepper motor and a cam arrangement to create pulses in the pipe carrying water to the system. However, I can't get higher frequencies of pressure oscillations.

I have flow rates in the range of 0.01 to 0.09 ml / min. I have a syringe pump to take care of that. However, I am unable to figure out how to introduce pressure oscillations into the system.

That is when i thought a piston pump working at low rpm may do the trick. The pressure need not be fixed, but should be consistent.

Hope this info is more adequate.

Thanks
 
  • #4
banerjeerupak said:
I am working on an experiment where i would like to see how the system responds to pressure fluctuations.

I tried using a stepper motor and a cam arrangement to create pulses in the pipe carrying water to the system. However, I can't get higher frequencies of pressure oscillations.

I have flow rates in the range of 0.01 to 0.09 ml / min. I have a syringe pump to take care of that. However, I am unable to figure out how to introduce pressure oscillations into the system.

That is when i thought a piston pump working at low rpm may do the trick. The pressure need not be fixed, but should be consistent.

Hope this info is more adequate.

Thanks

What kind of pressures are we talking? Is this a water or oil system?
 
  • #5
What frequency of pulsation do you need? Can you create the pulsations using a valve? All you would need is a valve capable of acting fast enough, then open/close the valve quickly to get a pressure pulse.
 

Related to Variable Pressure: Is Piston Pump the Answer?

1. What is variable pressure and why is it important?

Variable pressure refers to the ability to adjust the pressure level of a system or device. In the case of a piston pump, this means being able to control the amount of force applied by the piston. This is important because it allows for more precise and efficient operation of the pump, as well as the ability to handle different types of fluids or materials.

2. How does a piston pump work?

A piston pump works by using a piston to create pressure and move fluid or material through a system. The piston moves back and forth within a cylinder, creating suction on one side and pressure on the other. This pressure forces the fluid or material through the pump and into the desired location.

3. What are the advantages of using a piston pump with variable pressure?

There are several advantages to using a piston pump with variable pressure. These include more precise control over flow rates, the ability to handle different types of fluids or materials, and increased efficiency and reliability. Additionally, variable pressure allows for better customization and adaptation to changing conditions.

4. What types of industries or applications benefit from using a piston pump with variable pressure?

Piston pumps with variable pressure are commonly used in industries such as agriculture, oil and gas, manufacturing, and water treatment. They are also useful in applications that require precise control over fluid or material flow, such as dosing and metering.

5. Are there any limitations or drawbacks to using a piston pump with variable pressure?

While piston pumps with variable pressure have many advantages, there are also some limitations and drawbacks to consider. These may include higher initial costs, maintenance requirements, and the need for skilled operators. Additionally, some types of fluids or materials may not be suitable for use with a piston pump.

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