Verify Final Temperature of Cu-Water System?

In summary, the conversation discusses a physics problem involving the final temperature of a copper and water system in equilibrium, and the need for verifying the answer in Joules. The solution involves using the specific heat and mass of each substance and solving an algebraic equation. It is important to keep track of units throughout the calculation.
  • #1
pmalayavech
14
0

Homework Statement



Need a second person to help verify if answer is correct.

Copper with a mass of 300 g initially at 200 °C is added to water with an initial temperature of 10 °C and mass of 500 g. What is the final temperature of the system when they are in equilibrium?

ANSWER must be in JOULES

My variables

Cu specific heat: 385.112 J/kg C

Water specificheat: 4186 J

Homework Equations



Mm Cm (Tm - Tf) = Mw Cw (Tf-Tw)

The Attempt at a Solution



Mm Cm (Tm - Tf) = Mw Cw (Tf-Tw)

I convert g to kg for mass
500g to .500kg and 300g to .300kgnow plug equation and work the algebraic equation

(.300) (385.112)(200-tf) = (.500)(4186)(tf-10)

to

(23106.72-115.5336Tf)=(2093Tf-20930)

to

4036.72 = 2208.5336 Tf

to

19.93934799 = Tf

Tf= 19.9 J/kg C
 
Last edited:
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  • #2


Get the same answer but units oC.
 
  • #3


so its not in Joules? but Celsius?
 
  • #4


pmalayavech said:
so its not in Joules? but Celsius?
Yes, the answer is a temperature, so it cannot be in Joules.
It is a good idea to include the units in the equations all the way through. This helps in two ways. It can show up dimensional mismatches (like Joules versus degrees) and also aids in conversion between different units of the same dimension (oC v. oF).
 
  • #5


I would first check the units of the final answer to ensure that it is in Joules, as requested in the problem. The final answer is in degrees Celsius, so it is not in the correct units. I would also double check the calculations and make sure that all the numbers and units are correct. Additionally, I would suggest using more significant figures in the calculations to ensure accuracy. Lastly, I would recommend using the correct specific heat values for copper and water, which are 0.385 J/g C and 4.186 J/g C, respectively. With these corrections, the final temperature would be approximately 21.1 °C. I would also suggest having a second person check the calculations to verify the answer.
 

Related to Verify Final Temperature of Cu-Water System?

What is the purpose of verifying the final temperature of a Cu-water system?

The purpose of verifying the final temperature of a Cu-water system is to ensure that the temperature reached during the experiment is accurate and consistent with the expected results. This helps to validate the data collected and ensures that any calculations or conclusions drawn from the experiment are reliable.

How is the final temperature of a Cu-water system measured?

The final temperature of a Cu-water system is typically measured using a thermometer or a temperature sensor. The thermometer should be calibrated to ensure accurate readings, and the temperature sensor should be placed in a location that is representative of the overall system.

What factors can affect the final temperature of a Cu-water system?

Several factors can affect the final temperature of a Cu-water system, including the initial temperature of the water and the amount of copper used in the system. Other factors such as the rate of heat transfer and the presence of impurities in the water can also impact the final temperature.

Why is it important to control the experimental conditions when verifying the final temperature of a Cu-water system?

Controlling the experimental conditions, such as the amount of copper and water used, is important because it helps to minimize variables that could affect the final temperature. This ensures that the experiment is repeatable and the results are accurate.

What is the typical range of final temperatures for a Cu-water system?

The typical range of final temperatures for a Cu-water system is between 70-80 degrees Celsius. However, this can vary depending on the specific experimental conditions and the amount of copper and water used in the system.

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