Volcanic heat from compression or just friction?

In summary, the Earth's interior is hot enough to melt rock. Friction plays a role, but compression also contributes to the heat. Decay of radioactive elements is also a factor, though not necesarily related to the heat in the Earth core.
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The interior of the Earth is hot enough to melt rock. Obviously friction plays a role.

But does compression also heat rock? If yes, what is the underlying chemical mechanism, perhaps an exothermous reaction, that heats rock?
 
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  • #2
One must also consider tidal forces between the moon and earth. These gravitational forces also contribute to the heat inside the earth.

As another effect, albeit negligible, one must consider the decay of unstable isotopes, such as thos of uranium, radium, barium and many other trace elements.
 
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  • #3
Any thoughts on how the compression heats rock? High compression should only mean molecules are closer together. Why would this make them vibrate more?
 
  • #4
Ulysees said:
Any thoughts on how the compression heats rock? High compression should only mean molecules are closer together. Why would this make them vibrate more?

I am not sure as to the mechanics of how compression heats up rock or any other object, for that matter. I only know that it does, sorry for a thin answer. I'd suggest you post your compression question in classical physics, it will be answered easily there.
 
  • #5
I'm not certain, but I seem to remember hearing that radioactive decay is not negligable, but an important factor. As to compression, you must remember that most all models of planetary formation involve a cloud of gas and dust and small debris falling into a lump. This initial formation causes a great deal of heat and that heat is then trapped as new layers are added.
 
  • #6
It is thought that original heat of compression has dissipated out a few billion years ago. http://www.me.ucsb.edu/dept_site/vanyo.htm [Broken] may contribute significantly to the heat of the Earth core.

However, "volcanic heat" is not necesarily related to the heat in the Earth core but is mostly thought to be http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1365-3121.1997.d01-4.x in "the ring of fire".
 
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1. How does volcanic heat from compression or friction contribute to volcanic eruptions?

Volcanic heat from compression or friction can contribute to volcanic eruptions by increasing the temperature and pressure within the magma chamber, causing it to expand and rise towards the surface. This can also result in the buildup of gases within the magma, which can further increase pressure and trigger an eruption.

2. Is volcanic heat from compression or friction the same as geothermal energy?

No, volcanic heat from compression or friction is not the same as geothermal energy. Geothermal energy is heat that is generated from the Earth's core and is harnessed for various purposes, such as electricity production. Volcanic heat from compression or friction, on the other hand, is the heat generated within the Earth's crust due to the movement of tectonic plates and the resulting friction and compression.

3. How is volcanic heat from compression or friction measured?

Volcanic heat from compression or friction can be measured using various methods, such as temperature sensors and satellite imagery. Scientists also use geophysical techniques, such as seismic monitoring and gravity measurements, to estimate the amount of heat being generated within the Earth's crust.

4. Can volcanic heat from compression or friction be harnessed as a source of energy?

Yes, volcanic heat from compression or friction can be harnessed as a source of energy through geothermal power plants. These plants use the heat from underground reservoirs of hot water to generate electricity. However, this method of harnessing energy is limited to areas with high levels of volcanic activity and is not without its environmental impacts.

5. Can volcanic heat from compression or friction cause earthquakes?

Yes, volcanic heat from compression or friction can contribute to earthquake activity. The movement of tectonic plates and the resulting friction and pressure can cause earthquakes, which can also trigger volcanic eruptions. In some cases, the release of volcanic heat through magma movement can also lead to small tremors or earthquakes.

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