Water Evaporation Rate at 80°C, 1 atm

In summary, the water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm refers to the rate at which liquid water changes into water vapor at a temperature of 80°C and a pressure of 1 atmosphere (atm). It can be affected by several factors such as temperature, pressure, surface area, humidity, and the presence of other substances. The rate can be measured using various methods and studying it is important for understanding the water cycle and has practical applications in industries such as agriculture and engineering. The water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm differs from other temperatures and pressures, with a higher temperature and lower pressure typically resulting in a higher evaporation rate.
  • #1
nat558
3
0
For stirred, maintaining temperature at 80 and at atm pressure

thx ..
 
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  • #2
heat of vapourization of water is 40.65 kJ/mol. See if that helps.

Also; how much water? How fast are you stirring? Surface area of the water? 80°C or 80°F

my pleasure ..
 
  • #3
redargon said:
heat of vapourization of water is 40.65 kJ/mol. See if that helps.

Also; how much water? How fast are you stirring? Surface area of the water? 80°C or 80°F

my pleasure ..

Umm 150rpm , surface 50 C , 2.5m diameter of the tank
 
  • #4
can someone help me how to calculate the evaporation rate of water at 95 degree celsius (kg/hr.m2 )
 
  • #5


Thank you for your question. The evaporation rate of water at 80°C and 1 atm pressure is dependent on several factors, including the surface area of the water, the air flow over the surface, and the presence of any impurities in the water. However, assuming ideal conditions and constant stirring to maintain the temperature and pressure, the evaporation rate would likely be higher compared to water at lower temperatures and pressures. This is because at higher temperatures, the molecules in the water have higher kinetic energy and are more likely to break free from the liquid surface and enter the gas phase. Additionally, at 1 atm pressure, the air above the water has a lower capacity for holding water vapor, so the water molecules will quickly evaporate to reach equilibrium. It is important to note, however, that the evaporation rate may also be affected by other factors such as humidity and air movement. Overall, the evaporation rate at 80°C and 1 atm can be expected to be relatively high, but precise measurements would require further experimentation and consideration of all relevant variables.
 

Related to Water Evaporation Rate at 80°C, 1 atm

What is the definition of water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm?

The water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm refers to the rate at which liquid water changes into water vapor at a temperature of 80°C and a pressure of 1 atmosphere (atm). This process is known as evaporation.

What factors affect the water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm?

The water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm can be affected by several factors such as the temperature and pressure of the surrounding environment, the surface area of the water, the humidity of the air, and the presence of other substances in the water.

How can the water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm be measured?

The water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm can be measured using various methods such as the weight loss method, the wet bulb-dry bulb method, and the gravimetric method. These methods involve measuring the amount of water that has evaporated over a certain period of time.

What is the significance of studying the water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm?

Studying the water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm is important for understanding the process of evaporation, which is a key part of the water cycle. It also has practical applications in industries such as agriculture, where evaporation rates can affect crop growth, and in engineering, where it is important for designing efficient cooling systems.

How does the water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm differ from other temperatures and pressures?

The water evaporation rate at 80°C, 1 atm is just one specific condition in which water can evaporate. At different temperatures and pressures, the rate of evaporation can vary significantly. For example, at higher temperatures and lower pressures, the evaporation rate will generally be higher.

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