Wave motion is expressed with trigonometric functions

In summary: I'm not sure if it can be used for AS Level Physics for Edxcel Nuffield, but it might be useful for other students.
  • #1
Bez
14
0
I was wondering if someone would be able to help me with the following questions:
-A progessive wave has amplitude 0.40m and wave length 2.0m. At a given times the displacement y=0 at x=0. Calulate the displacement at (a)t=5sec (b) t=0.8sec
-A progessive wave has amplitude 2.5m and a time period of 10sec. At a given distance the displacement y=0 at t=0. Calulate the displacement at (a)t=0.001sec (b) t=0.003sec

It would be useful if there is a step up step method, which could show how you got to the answer that you got, which therefore means that i would be able to use it for other examples. Thankyou.
 
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  • #2
I'm not sure if I can give you an exact answer, but wave motion is expressed with trigonometric functions. If you figure out what the definitions of the amplitude and wave length are, you should be able to construct a time dependent function which will give you the answer.
 
  • #3
radou said:
I'm not sure if I can give you an exact answer, but wave motion is expressed with trigonometric functions. If you figure out what the definitions of the amplitude and wave length are, you should be able to construct a time dependent function which will give you the answer.

so i just draw a wave and find the displacement and time using tht?... well i did try tht but it didn't really help much.:cry:
 
  • #4
Did you use an equation of the form [tex]y = A \sin (\omega t - \phi)[/tex]? Something at least similar to that must have been mentioned in your lecture notes, if you're dealing with waves.
 
  • #5
well... we only started the topic therefore we were only taught the equation: f=1/T or T=1/f and v=wavelenght x f.
 
  • #6
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  • #7
hey whn it comes to drawing the waves---how do u know where the 0.50m or the 1.4m is? as you are just drawing a wave... the amplitude is the displacement right? and the wave has a amplitude of 0.40m:confused:
 
  • #8
Bez said:
hey whn it comes to drawing the waves---how do u know where the 0.50m or the 1.4m is? as you are just drawing a wave... the amplitude is the displacement right? and the wave has a amplitude of 0.40m:confused:

The answer to your question is on the link I gave you - all you have to do is read. :wink:
 
  • #9
nope... the site wasn't really useful in solving the question tht i had... u sure it can be used for AS Level Physics for Edxcel Nuffield?
 
  • #10
thanks you letting me know about the site.
 

Related to Wave motion is expressed with trigonometric functions

1. What is wave motion?

Wave motion refers to the propagation of a disturbance or energy through a medium, such as water or air. This disturbance travels in a repeating pattern and can be described by various mathematical functions, including trigonometric functions.

2. What are trigonometric functions?

Trigonometric functions are mathematical functions that relate the angles of a right triangle to the lengths of its sides. These functions include sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, and cosecant, and are often used to describe wave motion.

3. How are trigonometric functions used to express wave motion?

Trigonometric functions are used to express wave motion by describing the relationship between the displacement of a wave and its position in space and time. For example, the sine function can be used to represent the displacement of a wave over time.

4. Why are trigonometric functions useful in studying wave motion?

Trigonometric functions are useful in studying wave motion because they provide a mathematical framework for understanding and analyzing the behavior of waves. They can also be used to make predictions about the properties of waves, such as their amplitude, frequency, and wavelength.

5. Can wave motion be expressed with other mathematical functions?

Yes, wave motion can also be described using other mathematical functions, such as exponential functions, polynomial functions, and even complex functions. However, trigonometric functions are often preferred due to their ability to accurately model the periodic nature of wave motion.

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