What are the right reasons to study engineering ?

In summary, the right reasons to study engineering include having a strong interest in physics and mathematics, being practical and hands-on, and enjoying building and analyzing machines. Pursuing medicine may also be a potential career path for those interested in engineering. While some may steer others away from studying engineering, it is important to make the decision based on personal interests and not external opinions. Engineers may have diverse backgrounds and experiences, and motivation for pursuing the career should not solely be for money or status. For those interested in science and practical applications, engineering may be a fulfilling field to explore.
  • #1
RufusDawes
156
0
What are the right reasons to study engineering ?

Does an interest in physics and mathematics cut it ?

How do you picture your life if you weren't an engineer.
 
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  • #2
If you like building and analyzing machines, you'd like being an engineer. An interest in physics and mathematics is essential.

- Warren
 
  • #3
I guess that about sums it up
 
  • #4
I think you certainly need to be strong in math and physics. However, you ultimately have to have a very strong desire to determine how machines, systems, electronic devices, and etc. function.

You should also be somewhat practical and 'hands-on'. As an engineer it isn't quite enough to be able to draw and understand the physics involved you also have to be able to determine how things fit together and help solve practical problems that come along when it is time to actually build something.

If I were not an engineer I would have probably pursued medicine.
 
  • #5
h2oski1326 said:
I think you certainly need to be strong in math and physics. However, you ultimately have to have a very strong desire to determine how machines, systems, electronic devices, and etc. function.

You should also be somewhat practical and 'hands-on'. As an engineer it isn't quite enough to be able to draw and understand the physics involved you also have to be able to determine how things fit together and help solve practical problems that come along when it is time to actually build something.

If I were not an engineer I would have probably pursued medicine.

Aren't are you happy with engineering? It's an amazing field. Why pursue medicine?
 
  • #6
RufusDawes said:
What are the right reasons to study engineering ?
Because is fun, and one does useful work.

Does an interest in physics and mathematics cut it ?
Certainly

How do you picture your life if you weren't an engineer.
I'd probably be an applied physicist. Actually, I've been an engineer for so long, I can't imagine being anything else - except possibly being a farmer or a mountain man.
 
  • #7
thinkies said:
Aren't are you happy with engineering? It's an amazing field. Why pursue medicine?

You misinterpret; I meant that as, if I had to choose something else to study, I would choose medicine. I am very happy as an engineer, I find it suits my interests quite well and is challenging enough that I am hardly ever bored.
 
  • #8
h2oski1326 said:
I think you certainly need to be strong in math and physics. However, you ultimately have to have a very strong desire to determine how machines, systems, electronic devices, and etc. function.

You should also be somewhat practical and 'hands-on'. As an engineer it isn't quite enough to be able to draw and understand the physics involved you also have to be able to determine how things fit together and help solve practical problems that come along when it is time to actually build something.

If I were not an engineer I would have probably pursued medicine.

So would you say that any would be electrical/electronics engineer would be the type of person who has taken the initiative thoughout their life to develop a good practical hands on understanding of the devices ?

Or is the demonstrated interest in physics and mathematics such as taking the high level classes in school enough ?
 
  • #9
RufusDawes said:
So would you say that any would be electrical/electronics engineer would be the type of person who has taken the initiative thoughout their life to develop a good practical hands on understanding of the devices ?

Or is the demonstrated interest in physics and mathematics such as taking the high level classes in school enough ?

I would say that either could end up being an electrical engineer. Everyone is different, and everyone has different circumstances in their youth. Just because someone doesn't take a bunch of things apart as a child doesn't mean anything I was merely commenting on things that are seen in engineers.

Any desire to be an engineer is great and I would encourage you to pursue it, if that is what you want.

I would avoid pursuing the career if motivation is money or some kind of status, but other than that I say go for it. Also, do not let any decision be swayed heavily by some person on a message board. Talk with a guidance counselor, a family friend, or someone about the decision.
 
  • #10
h2oski1326 said:
I would say that either could end up being an electrical engineer. Everyone is different, and everyone has different circumstances in their youth. Just because someone doesn't take a bunch of things apart as a child doesn't mean anything I was merely commenting on things that are seen in engineers.

Any desire to be an engineer is great and I would encourage you to pursue it, if that is what you want.

I would avoid pursuing the career if motivation is money or some kind of status, but other than that I say go for it. Also, do not let any decision be swayed heavily by some person on a message board. Talk with a guidance counselor, a family friend, or someone about the decision.

I wish I had studied it when I was younger. I'm interested in electricity and at the end of high school I developed an ignorant fascination with the power of calculus that I did not chose to explore.

That and I got a little exposure to what ECE will involve through friends who have studied it.

Everyone I have spoken to has told me not to study engineering but I don't fully trust their judgement.
 
  • #11
If you like science in a practical rather than theoretical way. If you're a big fan of physics I don't think you'd be too happy as a civil or mechanical engineering. There are a lot of design aspects such as material selection and cost analysis, which may bore some people.
 
  • #12
some ppl could be very jelous of you and steer you away from studying engineering.

if I didn't study engineering probably I would be a math/physics teacher or physician,

my father told me; if you don't study I'll be working in European bakery selling fresh bred and yogurt every morning:-) , although I love those euro buns and tasty east euro yogurt
 
  • #13
Study engineering if you're interested in practical things and/or how things work.

if i didnt go into engineering... hmm... I'm probably one of the very few people here who would've gone into a non-technical/science field. architecture or urban planning would've been my major since I've always had a fascination with buildings, structures, and cities.
 
  • #14
Go to engineering if you find theory too hard.
 
  • #15
To do engineering, you have to like making stuff. It doesn't matter so much what particular kind of stuff it is; but as an engineer, you will spend your professional life designing, testing, and/or fabricating things of one variety or another. I think, to truly enjoy it, you have to be the kind of person who likes "doing" more than "thinking". You have to be a hands-on kind of person, a tinkerer. This is not to say that engineers don't do plenty of thinking; but to truly enjoy it, you have to be the kind of person who is turned on by the actual building and completing of projects.

And if you are that kind of person, and good at it, you will make boatloads of money.

If you prefer the more theoretical side of things, considering doing physics.
 

Related to What are the right reasons to study engineering ?

What are the right reasons to study engineering?

1. What is the job outlook for engineering graduates?

The job outlook for engineering graduates is very promising. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in engineering occupations is projected to grow 4% from 2019 to 2029, adding about 316,000 new jobs.

2. Is engineering a lucrative career path?

Engineering is considered one of the most lucrative career paths. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, the average starting salary for engineering graduates is $69,961, which is significantly higher than the average starting salary for all graduates.

3. What skills are necessary for a successful career in engineering?

Some essential skills for a successful career in engineering include problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity, attention to detail, and strong analytical skills. Communication and teamwork skills are also important for collaborating with other engineers and professionals.

4. What are the different types of engineering fields?

There are various types of engineering fields, including mechanical, electrical, civil, chemical, and computer engineering. Other specialized areas include aerospace, biomedical, environmental, and industrial engineering.

5. What are the potential benefits of studying engineering?

Studying engineering can lead to various benefits, such as a high-paying job, job stability, opportunities for advancement, and the ability to make a positive impact on society through problem-solving and innovation. Engineering education also teaches valuable skills that can be applied to various industries and career paths.

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