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Other What are you reading now? (STEM only)

  1. Apr 28, 2017 #1

    Demystifier

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    What book are you reading now, or have been reading recently? Only STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) books are counted.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 28, 2017 #2

    DrClaude

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    Staff: Mentor

    D. J. Tritton, Physical Fluid Dynamics. I never formally learned this topic, but I now need it for my teaching. I really like the way the book is structured, starting with phenomenology before delving into the equations.
     
  4. Apr 28, 2017 #3

    Demystifier

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  5. Apr 28, 2017 #4

    DrClaude

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    Staff: Mentor

    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  6. Apr 28, 2017 #5

    Dr Transport

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    Computational Electromagnetics for RF and Microwave Engineering, David Davidson
     
  7. Apr 28, 2017 #6

    vanhees71

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    2016 Award

    This semester, I've to create problems for a GR/cosmology lecture. So I'm right now reading a bit in the literature. Whenever there's something unclear, I turn (of course) to

    S. Weinberg, Gravitation and Kosmologie, Wiley&Sons, Inc., New York, London, Sydney, Toronto, 1972.
     
  8. Apr 28, 2017 #7

    jasonRF

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    I like this book for the same reason, along with the experimental results that are included throughout the book. Was easy to read as a student - much nicer than Landau and Lifshitz, the other book we used for the class.
     
  9. Apr 28, 2017 #8

    jasonRF

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    I've been reading "Mathematics for the physical sciences" by Laurent Schwartz, mostly to see how he presents distribution theory for an audience of non-mathematicians.
     
  10. Apr 28, 2017 #9
    Tom M. Apostol, Calculus I, II. I never had a chance to study rigorous Calculus, so back to the basics!
     
  11. Apr 28, 2017 #10

    martinbn

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    I am reading "Perfect Rigour" - Masha Gessen, I don't know if that counts.

    If I had to make a list of books on this topic I would put that at the end. No, in fact I will not put it in the list.
     
  12. Apr 28, 2017 #11
    I am reading Zee's Gravitation. I am going really slow as I find it is a relatively hard book to read but it is very rewarding.... What I am really enjoying though is the video series on Mathematical Physics by Prof. Balakrishnan. I am also reading a bit on AP calculus topics (more like getting familiar with) as I will soon have to teach my daughter.
     
  13. Apr 29, 2017 #12
    Rereading MTW Gravitation. Much prefer this canonical geometric GR approach to Weinberg's book which I read about a year ago.
     
  14. Apr 29, 2017 #13
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  15. Apr 29, 2017 #14

    atyy

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    I've been reading the 2nd edition of Sutton and Barto's Reinforcement Learning, trying to learn how the biology and machine learning ideas are related.
     
  16. Apr 29, 2017 #15

    FactChecker

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    Explorations in Mathematical Physics by Don Koks. I want to see physics math done from a geometric algebra point of view. (But I am afraid that the physics will be too tough for me.)
     
  17. Apr 29, 2017 #16
    I'm preparing for uni in September by working through Newtonian Mechanics by French, and reviewing calculus from Lang/Kline. Occasionally I'll reference HRW if I find myself struggling with a problem.
     
  18. Apr 29, 2017 #17

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    I am reading Jackson's ED 3rd edition, Aitchinson's and Hey's Gauge book latest edition, also Peskin's, Brown's, Ryder's and Zuber's books and Ashcroft's book accompanied with a problem book by Han on Solid state physics.

    A few months ago (November,December a bit of january), I was also reading books of Munkres on Analysis on Manifolds and a book on representation of finite groups by Liebeck's and Gordon's; I should really return to these book someday.
     
  19. Apr 29, 2017 #18

    ibkev

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    I'm working through the new 5th edition (2016) of Gilbert Strang's https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0980232775/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1. I like Strang because he puts a lot of effort into showing you how to think of the subject on an intuitive level.

    Also, I stumbled across this little gem... Kuldeep Singh's https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0199654441/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I find it a great, light book for very quickly building up intuition and the big picture. Much of the book is devoted to Question/Answer dialog as if you were conversing with a prof and it has many fully solved problems. Sometimes I find it light enough that I just skim some pages but that's perfect because there are plenty of other books that are tough slogging. I could see folks who are self studying, finding this book very appealing as an appetizer before taking on something more meaty like Friedman or Treil.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  20. Apr 29, 2017 #19
    I have this book/ Looks great. Been meaning to read it for a while now...so much to read and so little time.
     
  21. Apr 30, 2017 #20
    I was reading Shankar Quantum Mechanics but I had to take it back to the library.
    Now I am browsing Whittaker, Analytical Dynamics, and also Torge, Geodesy.
     
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