What are you reading now? (STEM only)

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Demystifier
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Main Question or Discussion Point

What book are you reading now, or have been reading recently? Only STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) books are counted.
 
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  • #2
DrClaude
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D. J. Tritton, Physical Fluid Dynamics. I never formally learned this topic, but I now need it for my teaching. I really like the way the book is structured, starting with phenomenology before delving into the equations.
 
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  • #5
Dr Transport
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Computational Electromagnetics for RF and Microwave Engineering, David Davidson
 
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  • #6
vanhees71
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This semester, I've to create problems for a GR/cosmology lecture. So I'm right now reading a bit in the literature. Whenever there's something unclear, I turn (of course) to

S. Weinberg, Gravitation and Kosmologie, Wiley&Sons, Inc., New York, London, Sydney, Toronto, 1972.
 
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  • #7
jasonRF
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D. J. Tritton, Physical Fluid Dynamics. I never formally learned this topic, but I now need it for my teaching. I really like the way the book is structured, starting with phenomenology before delving into the equations.
I like this book for the same reason, along with the experimental results that are included throughout the book. Was easy to read as a student - much nicer than Landau and Lifshitz, the other book we used for the class.
 
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  • #8
jasonRF
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I've been reading "Mathematics for the physical sciences" by Laurent Schwartz, mostly to see how he presents distribution theory for an audience of non-mathematicians.
 
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  • #9
Tom M. Apostol, Calculus I, II. I never had a chance to study rigorous Calculus, so back to the basics!
 
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  • #10
martinbn
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I am reading "Perfect Rigour" - Masha Gessen, I don't know if that counts.

This semester, I've to create problems for a GR/cosmology lecture. So I'm right now reading a bit in the literature. Whenever there's something unclear, I turn (of course) to

S. Weinberg, Gravitation and Kosmologie, Wiley&Sons, Inc., New York, London, Sydney, Toronto, 1972.
If I had to make a list of books on this topic I would put that at the end. No, in fact I will not put it in the list.
 
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  • #11
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I am reading Zee's Gravitation. I am going really slow as I find it is a relatively hard book to read but it is very rewarding.... What I am really enjoying though is the video series on Mathematical Physics by Prof. Balakrishnan. I am also reading a bit on AP calculus topics (more like getting familiar with) as I will soon have to teach my daughter.
 
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  • #12
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Rereading MTW Gravitation. Much prefer this canonical geometric GR approach to Weinberg's book which I read about a year ago.
 
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  • #13
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I am now reading https://www.amazon.com/dp/3642372759/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20.
I consider it a really amazing textbook on the subject. If I remember well, Leonard Susskind somewhere in his Modern Physics Special Relativity lectures remarked that SR can be learnt within days. This book doesn't support this opinion. Looks like I'm definitely not in Susskind's league :-)
 
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  • #14
atyy
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I've been reading the 2nd edition of Sutton and Barto's Reinforcement Learning, trying to learn how the biology and machine learning ideas are related.
 
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  • #15
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Explorations in Mathematical Physics by Don Koks. I want to see physics math done from a geometric algebra point of view. (But I am afraid that the physics will be too tough for me.)
 
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I'm preparing for uni in September by working through Newtonian Mechanics by French, and reviewing calculus from Lang/Kline. Occasionally I'll reference HRW if I find myself struggling with a problem.
 
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  • #17
MathematicalPhysicist
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I am reading Jackson's ED 3rd edition, Aitchinson's and Hey's Gauge book latest edition, also Peskin's, Brown's, Ryder's and Zuber's books and Ashcroft's book accompanied with a problem book by Han on Solid state physics.

A few months ago (November,December a bit of january), I was also reading books of Munkres on Analysis on Manifolds and a book on representation of finite groups by Liebeck's and Gordon's; I should really return to these book someday.
 
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  • #18
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I'm working through the new 5th edition (2016) of Gilbert Strang's https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0980232775/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1&tag=. I like Strang because he puts a lot of effort into showing you how to think of the subject on an intuitive level.

Also, I stumbled across this little gem... Kuldeep Singh's https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0199654441/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1&tag= I find it a great, light book for very quickly building up intuition and the big picture. Much of the book is devoted to Question/Answer dialog as if you were conversing with a prof and it has many fully solved problems. Sometimes I find it light enough that I just skim some pages but that's perfect because there are plenty of other books that are tough slogging. I could see folks who are self studying, finding this book very appealing as an appetizer before taking on something more meaty like Friedman or Treil.
 
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  • #19
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Explorations in Mathematical Physics by Don Koks. I want to see physics math done from a geometric algebra point of view. (But I am afraid that the physics will be too tough for me.)
I have this book/ Looks great. Been meaning to read it for a while now...so much to read and so little time.
 
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  • #20
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I was reading Shankar Quantum Mechanics but I had to take it back to the library.
Now I am browsing Whittaker, Analytical Dynamics, and also Torge, Geodesy.
 
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  • #21
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Geometry and The Imagination: David Hilbert. Fascinating Stuff.
 
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  • #22
Aufbauwerk 2045
Foundations of Geometry, also by David Hilbert. I'm reading this because I've been working on automatic theorem proving as applied to Euclid. Hilbert filled in some logical gaps in Euclid.
 
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  • #23
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Linear Alegebra and its applications - Gilbert Strang
Introduction to Mechanics - kleppner and kolenkow
Electricity and Magnetism - Edward Purcell

I borrowed these physics books but now I find them very difficult.
 
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  • #24
vanhees71
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Be warned about Purcell. It's quite confusing and unnecessarily complicated in its attempt to be pedagogical. It's easier to use the mathematics of Minkowski space rather than handwaving pedagogics.
 
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  • #25
jasonRF
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Linear Alegebra and its applications - Gilbert Strang
Introduction to Mechanics - kleppner and kolenkow
Electricity and Magnetism - Edward Purcell

I borrowed these physics books but now I find them very difficult.
Buffu,

If you haven't already studied vector calculus and introductory calculus-based mechanics and electromagnetism (from a source such as Halliday and Resnick, or some other equivalent book) then those physics books will be quite difficult. I took a course out of Purcell, and even with access to very helpful Professor and TA it was brutal.

Strang should be fine - perhaps it just isn't your style. Have you looked at the mit open courseware site for the class that is based on that book?
 
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