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Featured Other What are you reading now? (STEM only)

  1. Jan 3, 2018 #81
    Reading How to Study as a Mathematics Major by Lara Alcock.
    Although it's not my intention to major in Mathematics, I know that physics requires advanced mathematics which is why I thought this would be useful. I've learned a ton from it so far such as learning to treat things like processes as objects, and learning how to solve things without being provided examples, etc.
     
  2. Jan 3, 2018 #82

    berkeman

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  3. Jan 4, 2018 #83

    lekh2003

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    Does the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy count?:wink:

    If not, I'm reading "What is Life", by Schrodinger.
     
  4. Jan 4, 2018 #84
    Slowly making my way through the 7th edition of Mathematical Methods for Physicists by Arfken/Weber/Harris.
     
  5. Jan 4, 2018 #85
    The most interesting thing I'm reading right now is "Feynman Lectures on Computation". I highly recommend it to anyone who wants a relaxed but insightful introduction to the theory of computation, among other things. Some other topics that he covers are the thermodynamics of computation, information theory, and quantum computing.
     
  6. Jan 4, 2018 #86

    George Jones

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    Right now, Duncan is sitting on my desk, but ... :cry:

     
  7. Jan 7, 2018 #87

    opus

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    The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman.
    Next time someone calls you "bird brain", take it as a high compliment.

    41nh5b-RJwL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
     
  8. Jan 8, 2018 #88

    vanhees71

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    But it depends somewhat on the bird! A raven seems to be pretty clever, while chicken are known to be somewhat limited...
     
  9. Jan 8, 2018 #89
    I was eating on the Riverwalk in San Antonio, TX a few years ago. A duck walked over and grabbed/tugged on my jeans looking for food. I actually remember thinking that that was pretty brilliant. There are birds like crows and ravens that are really smart and can use tools. The duck obviously couldn't do that, but it did end up getting a free and easy meal in the end!

    Just started reading Dreams of a Final Theory by Steven Weinberg. These kind of books definitely help keep me motivated when I feel like I've hit a wall!
     
  10. Jan 8, 2018 #90

    opus

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    True! But the cognitive abilities of birds vary in specialty. For an example, Crows understand the concept of metatools. That is, if they have a stick that is too short to grab a prize, they understand that they can use the short stick to get a longer stick which would ultimately get them what they're after. Pigeons can't do this, but their spacial intelligence in way up there. You can put them in a box, drive hundreds of miles away, and they'll fly back home with amazing accuracy. Another bird, and I don't remember the name, remembers where it stored over 600 items for as long as 6 months. Pretty nuts!
     
  11. Jan 9, 2018 #91

    Andy Resnick

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    Just finished Petr Beckman's "A History of Pi". Fascinating narrative written by a bracing narrator.
     
  12. Jan 9, 2018 #92
    Mathematical Problem Solving - Alan H. Schoenfeld

    The author is a mathematician who in 1975 upon reading George Polya's book "How to Solve It" (1945) noted how much in the book was what he did in problem solving. He wonder why he was not taught these strategies but had to learn them for himself. He raised the questions what does it mean to "think mathematically" and How can we help students to do it? He states the book's focus is the framework for the analysis of complex problem solving behavior. The book reviews his analysis of studies of actual problem solving sessions forming the basis of his subsequent work in math education.
     
  13. Jan 9, 2018 #93

    jasonRF

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    I really enjoyed that book, too. An uncle gave it to me when i was a young teenager and I found it to be inspiring.
     
  14. Jan 13, 2018 #94

    berkeman

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  15. Jan 13, 2018 #95

    vanhees71

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    Hm, I'm still waiting for getting the book (I ordered it on Dec/23), but books from the UK take pretty long if ordered directly from the publisher and not via Amazon :-(.
     
  16. Jan 13, 2018 #96
    I'm reading Statistical Mechanics by W.Greiner and Quantum Theory of Many-particle systems by Fetter&Walecka :headbang::headbang::headbang: I think I should try to understand more about Stat. Mechanics although I've passed it, I'm still not satisfied :oldfrown:
     
  17. Jan 15, 2018 #97

    vanhees71

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    Fetter&Walecka is a classic and among the best books on non-relativistic many-body QFT I know. Another good source is also Landau&Lifshitz vol. IX; for the more introductory parts of stat. mech. also vol. V. Of course, Greiner's book is also good.
     
  18. Jan 17, 2018 #98
    I'm happy to hear that, thanks a lot for your comment mr vanhees71 :oldtongue:
     
  19. Jan 19, 2018 #99

    vanhees71

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    I've got it too. So I've something interesting to look at the weekend :-)).
     
  20. Jan 27, 2018 #100

    vanhees71

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