What Book Best Explores Quantum Mechanics for Conceptual Thinkers?

In summary, the book should explain each and every aspect of quantum mechanics, give a conceptual understanding with the help of logical thinking, and be like that if you know the most basic theory and concept in quantum physics like De-Broglie hypothesis and imagine about it and make predictions and analyse it, then the book in front of you should talk to you in the same way.
  • #1
rahaverhma
69
1
Hi everyone ,
I am interested in learning quantum mechanics. I want to read a book which explains each and every aspect of quantum physics , gives a conceptual understanding with the help of logical thinking. Also it should be like that if I know the most basic theory and concept in Quantum Physics like De-Broglie hypothesis and I imagine about it and make predictions and analyse it , then the book in front of me should talk to me in the same way so that I know about the matter more deeply and boldly.
 
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  • #2
rahaverhma said:
Hi everyone ,
I am interested in learning quantum mechanics. I want to read a book which explains each and every aspect of quantum physics , gives a conceptual understanding with the help of logical thinking. Also it should be like that if I know the most basic theory and concept in Quantum Physics like De-Broglie hypothesis and I imagine about it and make predictions and analyse it , then the book in front of me should talk to me in the same way so that I know about the matter more deeply and boldly.
What level is your knowledge of mathematics?
 
  • #3
PeroK said:
What level is your knowledge of mathematics?

I have completed Bachelors in Physics from Delhi University. So, i know the mathematics concerning physics from Bachelor's course and also pure mathematics till class 12th.
 
  • #4
rahaverhma said:
I have completed Bachelors in Physics from Delhi University. So, i know the mathematics concerning physics from Bachelor's course and also pure mathematics till class 12th.
You did a degree in Physics without any QM?
 
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  • #5
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  • #6
Dear Sir , actually I studied all courses from Classical Physics to Modern Physics. But , as you know as time passes , we try to get more refined and deep thinking over the matter , for example , force is equal to the rate of change of momentum w.r.t time. Then how Newton came to this , has not been answered by anyone till now whom i have met with. So, I think now that I should myself go like Newton and formulate it. Now , coming to quantum mechanics , in my bachelor's course in our college only one faculty taught well and the subject was mathematical physics. The one of quantum mechanics taught like he just wanted to give you the information not knowledge and he was trying to get rid of her students including me because we could ask questions to her about QM. So , I hope that you have understood my position that I know every fact in quantum mechanics but don't know the philosophy behind it. Help me if you like.

Thanks.
 
  • #7
rahaverhma said:
Dear Sir , actually I studied all courses from Classical Physics to Modern Physics. But , as you know as time passes , we try to get more refined and deep thinking over the matter , for example , force is equal to the rate of change of momentum w.r.t time. Then how Newton came to this , has not been answered by anyone till now whom i have met with. So, I think now that I should myself go like Newton and formulate it. Now , coming to quantum mechanics , in my bachelor's course in our college only one faculty taught well and the subject was mathematical physics. The one of quantum mechanics taught like he just wanted to give you the information not knowledge and he was trying to get rid of her students including me because we could ask questions to her about QM. So , I hope that you have understood my position that I know every fact in quantum mechanics but don't know the philosophy behind it. Help me if you like.

Thanks.
If you want an understanding of QM you could start here:

https://physics.mq.edu.au/~jcresser/Phys304/Handouts/QuantumPhysicsNotes.pdf

Or, there is Susskind's theoretical minimum:



There's a book as well as these video lectures.

There are several threads on here discussing the recommendations for university textbooks. I have Introduction to QM by Griffiths and Modern QM by Sakurai.
 
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  • #8
rahaverhma said:
So , I hope that you have understood my position that I know every fact in quantum mechanics but don't know the philosophy behind it. Help me if you like.

Thanks.
In that case this book might suit you:

https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319658667

It presupposes a basic knowledge of QM, but emphasizes conceptual, philosophical and historical aspects .
 
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  • #9
rahaverhma said:
I want to read a book which explains each and every aspect of quantum physics
There is no such book.
 
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  • #10
Demystifier said:
There is no such book.

True, but he is being clearer about what he wants. He doesn't want a QM book. He wants a QM philosophy book.
 
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  • #11
At about the level of Griffiths, there is "QUANTUM MECHANICS A Paradigms Approach" by David McIntyre. This book has more emphasis on Dirac notation than does Griffiths, which I like.
 
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  • #12
I have heard that David Bohm treats QM philosophically in his 'Quantum Theory'.
Vanadium 50 said:
True, but he is being clearer about what he wants. He doesn't want a QM book. He wants a QM philosophy book.
 
  • #13
I don't know which book you mean, but there's a very good book by Bohm without philosophy and also presenting the subject using an orthodox interpretation. Historically, afaik, Bohm got to his alternative interpretation after writing the book, maybe even triggered by thinking about the foundations during writing this book.
 
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  • #14
vanhees71 said:
I don't know which book you mean, but there's a very good book by Bohm without philosophy and also presenting the subject using an orthodox interpretation. Historically, afaik, Bohm got to his alternative interpretation after writing the book, maybe even triggered by thinking about the foundations during writing this book.
I believe we are talking about the same book.
Quantum Theory ( Dover Books on Physics) by David Bohm
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0486659690/?tag=pfamazon01-20
 
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  • #15
rahaverhma said:
I know every fact in quantum mechanics
Really?
 
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  • #16
madscientist_93 said:
I believe we are talking about the same book.
Quantum Theory ( Dover Books on Physics) by David Bohm
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0486659690/?tag=pfamazon01-20

The philosophy in that book is wrong. Bohm, in that book, argued against the possibility of hidden variables.
 
  • #17
atyy said:
The philosophy in that book is wrong. Bohm, in that book, argued against the possibility of hidden variables.
How could philosophy be wrong or right?!
 
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  • #18
atyy said:
The philosophy in that book is wrong. Bohm, in that book, argued against the possibility of hidden variables.
Yes, but that's not wrong to date since nobody has discovered any "missing" or "hidden" variables whatsoever.
 
  • #19
vanhees71 said:
Yes, but that's not wrong to date since nobody has discovered any "missing" or "hidden" variables whatsoever.

It's wrong since Bohm was discussing the possibility, and Bohm later discovered that they can be constructed for some quantum mechanical theories.
 
  • #20
PeroK said:
If you want an understanding of QM you could start here:

https://physics.mq.edu.au/~jcresser/Phys304/Handouts/QuantumPhysicsNotes.pdf

Or, there is Susskind's theoretical minimum:



There's a book as well as these video lectures.

There are several threads on here discussing the recommendations for university textbooks. I have Introduction to QM by Griffiths and Modern QM by Sakurai.


Thank You , Sir.

haushofer said:
In that case this book might suit you:

https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319658667

It presupposes a basic knowledge of QM, but emphasizes conceptual, philosophical and historical aspects .

Thank you , Sir.
 
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  • #21
atyy said:
It's wrong since Bohm was discussing the possibility, and Bohm later discovered that they can be constructed for some quantum mechanical theories.
Which are the hidden variables in Bohm's reinterpretation of non-relativistic QT? There are no other observables than the usual ones in this interpretation than are in standard QT.
 
  • #22
martinbn said:
How could philosophy be wrong or right?!
Analytic philosophy, which often uses rigorous logic, can be right or wrong in the same way as mathematics can, by arriving at conclusions which in fact do or do not follow from the assumptions.
 
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  • #23
Demystifier said:
Analytic philosophy, which often uses rigorous logic, can be right or wrong in the same way as mathematics can, by arriving at conclusions which in fact do or do not follow from the assumptions.
Is that what @atyy meant? I don't think so, otherwise he would have pointed out the logical error.
 
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  • #24
martinbn said:
Is that what @atyy meant? I don't think so, otherwise he would have pointed out the logical error.
Well, in the book, Bohm used informal arguments rather than formal logic. But those arguments could be translated into formal logical arguments and then the place of logical error could be pinpointed.
 
  • #25
rahaverhma said:
Hi everyone ,
I am interested in learning quantum mechanics. I want to read a book which explains each and every aspect of quantum physics , gives a conceptual understanding with the help of logical thinking. Also it should be like that if I know the most basic theory and concept in Quantum Physics like De-Broglie hypothesis and I imagine about it and make predictions and analyse it , then the book in front of me should talk to me in the same way so that I know about the matter more deeply and boldly.

I think I can safely say that nobody really understands quantum mechanics. ## _{Richard}## ## _{Feynman}##

In light of Feynman's famous quote I suggest reading several of the classic Quantum texts. It's the differences in the way material is presented than might make you think more deeply in my view.
 
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  • #26
bob012345 said:
I think I can safely say that nobody really understands quantum mechanics. ## _{Richard}## ## _{Feynman}##

In light of Feynman's famous quote I suggest reading several of the classic Quantum texts. It's the differences in the way material is presented than might make you think more deeply in my view.

setup for Feynman's quote ( &t=7m40s ):


from the beginning of this lecture (&t=1m20s ):


See also
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/res...chard-feynman/#!6-probability-and-uncertainty

The videos above come from the Messenger Lectures from Cornell, 1964
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Character_of_Physical_Lawfor the textbook treatment:
"Read" Volume III
https://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/info/
 
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Related to What Book Best Explores Quantum Mechanics for Conceptual Thinkers?

1. What is quantum mechanics?

Quantum mechanics is a branch of physics that studies the behavior of matter and energy at a very small scale, such as atoms and subatomic particles. It explains how these particles interact and how they can exist in multiple states at the same time.

2. Why are books on quantum mechanics important?

Books on quantum mechanics are important because they provide a comprehensive understanding of this fundamental theory of physics. They also explain how quantum mechanics has revolutionized our understanding of the universe and has led to many technological advancements.

3. Who are some notable authors of books on quantum mechanics?

Some notable authors of books on quantum mechanics include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Richard Feynman, and Stephen Hawking. There are also many contemporary authors who have written extensively on the subject.

4. What are some common misconceptions about quantum mechanics?

One common misconception about quantum mechanics is that it only applies to the microscopic world and has no relevance to our everyday lives. In reality, many technologies, such as computers and smartphones, rely on the principles of quantum mechanics. Another misconception is that quantum mechanics allows for instantaneous communication or teleportation, which is not supported by scientific evidence.

5. Are books on quantum mechanics suitable for non-scientists?

Yes, there are many books on quantum mechanics that are written for a general audience and do not require a strong background in science. These books often use analogies and everyday examples to explain complex concepts, making them accessible to non-scientists. However, a basic understanding of physics and mathematics can enhance the reading experience.

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