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What is a two-variable graph?

  1. Feb 19, 2006 #1
    hi, I just need to what is a two-variable graph. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 19, 2006 #2

    HallsofIvy

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    That is not a standard terminology. It could mean either the graph of a function of one variable: y= f(x) in a cartesian coordinate system with one x-axis and one y-axis or (perhaps more likely what you mean) a function of two variables: z= f(x,y). To graph that you need three axes, x, y, z with the z-value (height of a surface above the xy-plane) given by f(x,y).
     
  4. Feb 19, 2006 #3
    Is this a two-variable graph?
    [​IMG]
    Also, could you bumb your explaination down for me since I'm a dumbask?
     
  5. Feb 19, 2006 #4
    Are you talking about statistics or co-ordinate geometry. Your terminlogy does not make this thing atleast specific?
     
  6. Feb 19, 2006 #5

    arildno

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    Raza:
    Those on your image are called level set curves; each is characterized by a constant value of R^2
     
  7. Feb 19, 2006 #6
    I have a project which states me to make a two-variable graph. This is for Data Management which is study for statistics. Are "Grade-10" and "Grade-12" variables?
     
  8. Feb 19, 2006 #7

    quasar987

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  9. Feb 19, 2006 #8
    So a 3D graph is a two-variable graph?
     
  10. Feb 19, 2006 #9

    quasar987

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    I believe that would be one way to put it!
     
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