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Engineering What is the best EE route for someone living in North Texas (DFW)?

Good afternoon,

I will be graduating with an EE bachelors in a year. To keep this brief, next semester I will be taking courses that branch off from general Electrical Engineering. I have the options of Telecom, Electronics, Control Systems, or Power Systems. Living in the DFW area, what would be a good combination (I plan on only choosing two of these four courses)? I know that telecommunications used to be huge in the DFW but I want some more opinions! I do enjoy it all but really I would prefer the most physics/math related fields! All feedback is welcome! Thank you.
 

FactChecker

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Control systems is very mathematical. There is a lot of analysis of stability, random noise, optimization, Kalman filters, neural networks, etc. It is a very wide and varied field.
 
Control systems is very mathematical. There is a lot of analysis of stability, random noise, optimization, Kalman filters, neural networks, etc. It is a very wide and varied field.
Would you pair it with any of the other options?
 

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If I had to pick one associated subject, I would say electronics. But I am not familiar enough with those subjects to be authoritative.
 
If I had to pick one associated subject, I would say electronics. But I am not familiar enough with those subjects to be authoritative.
Why electronics?
 

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Why electronics?
Because it has a lot of study of feedback, which is central to control, and it is very closely related to the implementation of control systems. Even digital control systems are often designed in terms of continuous electronic systems.
 

marcusl

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Why do you think geography should influence your coursework?
 
Why do you think geography should influence your coursework?
Well I want to work around the DFW area because it is a good living place for a young person like me. I would consider Austin, Texas and maybe Houston or San Antonio but other than that the other cities in Texas are small. I don't want to work in the middle of nowhere
 

marcusl

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Plano, Richardson and nearby areas are home to numerous telecom companies. You’ll find that communications encompasses many math-intensive (and extremely interesting) topics, including information theory, coding, statistical detection and estimation, and error correction techniques.
 

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The DFW area has a lot of high-tech work opportunities. There is a lot of aerospace work there, including Lockheed Martin Aero, which is the home of the F-35.
 
The DFW area has a lot of high-tech work opportunities. There is a lot of aerospace work there, including Lockheed Martin Aero, which is the home of the F-35.
Yes I have heard of Lockheed Martin, in fact my college has a small room dedicated to them. Unfortunately I do not have a green card and cannot work for them.
 
Plano, Richardson and nearby areas are home to numerous telecom companies. You’ll find that communications encompasses many math-intensive (and extremely interesting) topics, including information theory, coding, statistical detection and estimation, and error correction techniques.
Yes I have been considering telecommunications. Would control systems or electronics help with telecommunications? I would guess programming would but i do not want to take programming courses since I can easily learn programming at home.
 

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One of the fields that I think will be big is robotics. That is one reason that I feel ok suggesting control laws. Those robots will need to be controlled.
 
Are they only hiring noncitizens?
They require you to be able to get a government ID. A government ID requires a green card, I do not have one.
 
One of the fields that I think will be big is robotics. That is one reason that I feel ok suggesting control laws. Those robots will need to be controlled.
Why do you think it will be big?
 

marcusl

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Yes I have been considering telecommunications. Would control systems or electronics help with telecommunications? I would guess programming would but i do not want to take programming courses since I can easily learn programming at home.
Control systems--no. Electronics--yes, if you want to design circuit boards. RF and microwave electronics is better still. But then you could do either of those for any industry. Topics that are specific to telecom are as I mentioned earlier: information theory, coding, statistical detection and estimation, error correction techniques. Although you said you wanted something mathematical (hence sophisticated), it seems that you don't really.
 

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Control systems--no. Electronics--yes, if you want to design circuit boards. RF and microwave electronics is better still. But then you could do either of those for any industry. Topics that are specific to telecom are as I mentioned earlier: information theory, coding, statistical detection and estimation, error correction techniques. Although you said you wanted something mathematical (hence sophisticated), it seems that you don't really.
Well I like deriving equations, integration, vector calculus, linear algebra, etc. I encounter a lot of mathematics in my electromagnetics course but not my circuit analysis courses. I'll consider what you said and I think I will take telecommunications courses since my college offers a wide variety of them.
 

StatGuy2000

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They require you to be able to get a government ID. A government ID requires a green card, I do not have one.
Are you an international student currently studying in the US on a student visa? Because upon graduation you will need a green card or some equivalent form of ID to be able to work in the US, and I believe those already studying the US on a student visa should have an easier time getting permanent residency in the US.

If you are of undocumented status, however -- well that situation is far more complicated.
 

WWGD

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From what I understand , most graduates in STEM prefer large cities, just like yourself. But this means thete is pent up demand in smaller cities; good opportunities few will consider. You may want to consider another route and biting the bullet , working in a smaller town for a year or two and then , having gained experience and skills, moving to a bigger town.
 

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More and more work is being done remotely, especially if you are not working on classified work.
 
From what I understand , most graduates in STEM prefer large cities, just like yourself. But this means thete is pent up demand in smaller cities; good opportunities few will consider. You may want to consider another route and biting the bullet , working in a smaller town for a year or two and then , having gained experience and skills, moving to a bigger town.
I understand, I will keep that in mind. Thank you.
 
Are you an international student currently studying in the US on a student visa? Because upon graduation you will need a green card or some equivalent form of ID to be able to work in the US, and I believe those already studying the US on a student visa should have an easier time getting permanent residency in the US.

If you are of undocumented status, however -- well that situation is far more complicated.
DACA, hopefully I can find work after graduation.
 

CrysPhys

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Are you an international student currently studying in the US on a student visa? Because upon graduation you will need a green card or some equivalent form of ID to be able to work in the US, and I believe those already studying the US on a student visa should have an easier time getting permanent residency in the US.
The OP has already clarified that he does not fall under this scenario. But for the benefit of those who do (namely, foreign students studying in the US under a student visa) who might read this post, I'd like to offer some corrections. Some jobs in the US require US citizenship or permanent residency (green card) status; most do not. This is fortunate because a student visa does not provide a fast track to a green card.

If a foreigner is here in the US under a student visa, upon completion of his degree, the easiest path for him to apply to many jobs is under the OPT (Optional Practical Training) extension of his student visa. If his performance on the job is satisfactory, his employer will then sponsor him for an H1-B work visa.

Caveat: Immigration policy in the US is unstable at this moment, and these programs can be abruptly changed.
 

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