What is the force generated by a lever in a closed position?

In summary: I have to double check my posts all the time now too. It happens to the best of us!In summary, the conversation discusses a lever mechanism with a rack and pinion gear assembly and the resulting force at the contact pad when the lever is in the closed position. The force can be calculated by multiplying the torque of 252 Nm by the length of 138.5 mm (converted to meters). The conversation also mentions the importance of specifying units in a drawing.
  • #1
IanPibworth
12
1
So..

I'm trying to figure out if a design Idea has any potential. The figure below shows a lever mechanism operated by a rack and pinion gear assembly. I've calculated the torque in the pinion to be 252 Nm.

What will be the force at the contact pad, generated by the lever when in the closed position?

Any and all advice welcome..

upload_2018-8-29_15-54-58.png
 

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  • #2
The resulting force is equal to the 252 Nm torque x the 138.5 mm? length (converted to m) in your drawing. (Note: No drawing is complete without at least a note specifying the units of its dimensions.)
 
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  • #3
Oh.. its really as simple as that? I feel a bit stupid asking now, I thought because of the offset there would be an additional calculation.

Yes, the full drawing border has the specified units, in this case its mm.

Thanks for your help.
 
  • #4
JBA said:
The resulting force is equal to the 252 Nm torque x the 138.5 mm? length (converted to m) in your drawing. (Note: No drawing is complete without at least a note specifying the units of its dimensions.)
I think that should be

Force = torque/distance = 252/0.138
 
  • #5
{/QUOTE] JBA, post: 6048274, member: 570081"]The resulting force is equal to the 252 Nm torque x the 138.5 mm? length (converted to m)[/QUOTE]

I intended the conversion to refer to the 138.5 mm length; but, I can see how it might be a bit ambiguous and misconstrued as referring to the multiplication result.
 
  • #6
I wasn't referring to the conversion...

Torque = force * distance
so
Force = torque / distance
 
  • #7
Now I see my ridiculous error. I must start checking my posts a lot more carefully. I think my advancing age is beginning to affect my mind.
 
  • #8
Me too.
 

Related to What is the force generated by a lever in a closed position?

1. What is lever torque calculation?

Lever torque calculation is a method used to determine the amount of force needed to move an object using a lever. It takes into account the length of the lever, the distance from the pivot point to the object, and the weight of the object to calculate the torque required.

2. How is lever torque calculated?

Lever torque is calculated by multiplying the weight of the object by the distance from the pivot point to the object, and then dividing the result by the length of the lever. This gives the amount of force needed to move the object using the lever.

3. Why is lever torque calculation important?

Lever torque calculation is important because it allows us to determine the minimum amount of force needed to move an object using a lever. This information can be used in designing machines and tools, as well as in understanding the mechanical advantage of levers.

4. What are the units used in lever torque calculation?

The units used in lever torque calculation are typically newton-meters (Nm) or foot-pounds (ft-lb). These units represent the amount of force needed to produce a certain amount of torque, with one newton-meter equal to one joule and one foot-pound equal to 1.3558 joules.

5. Can lever torque calculation be applied to any type of lever?

Yes, lever torque calculation can be applied to any type of lever as long as the weight of the object and the distance from the pivot point to the object are known. It can also be used to compare the mechanical advantage of different types of levers.

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