What is the force of attraction between mars and the satellite?

In summary: Scientists want to place a 2900.0 kg satellite in orbit around Mars. They plan to have the satellite orbit a distance equal to 1.6 times the radius of Mars above the surface of the planet.To do this, they need to know the gravitational constant, G, the distance between the satellite and the planet, r, the mass of the satellite, and the mass of Mars. They also need to know the radius of Mars, rm. The gravitational constant, G, is 9.81 m/s2. The distance between the satellite and the planet, r, is 3.397 x 10^6 meters. The mass of the satellite, M, is 2900.0 kilograms
  • #1
aruji73
19
0
Scientists want to place a 2900.0 kg satellite in orbit around Mars. They plan to have the satellite orbit a distance equal to 1.6 times the radius of Mars above the surface of the planet. Here is some information that will help solve this problem:



mmars = 6.4191 x 10^23 kg
rmars = 3.397 x 10^6 m
G = 6.67428 x 10^-11 N-m2/kg2


I know F = G * m * M /r^2


But what should I plug for r , m , M , G
 
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  • #2
aruji73 said:
what should I plug for r , m , M , G
Start by making some suggestions that look reasonable to you.
 
  • #3
aruji73 said:
what should I plug for r , m , M , G
What do you understand the various symbols to stand for in the equation?
 
  • #4
What do you think ? I am worried about the radius because of the 1.6 times

m= 6.4191 x 10^23
G = is either 9.8 or 6.67428 x 10^-11
M= 2900
r=(1.6* 3.397 x 10^6) or 3.397 x 10^6
 
  • #5
aruji73 said:
What do you think ? I am worried about the radius because of the 1.6 times

m= 6.4191 x 10^23
G = is either 9.8 or 6.67428 x 10^-11
M= 2900
r=(1.6* 3.397 x 10^6) or 3.397 x 10^6
There's not much point in knowing an equation if you don't know what the variables in it represent. In this one, G is the gravitational constant, not 'g', the acceleration due to gravity at Earth's surface. The dimensions of the two are quite different. If you track the units through your working (and it is a very good idea to do that) you'll see that using 9.81 m/s2 would give the wrong dimensions for force in the answer.
r is the distance between the masses. In principle, this should refer only to point masses. Gravitational attraction between two bodies of arbitrary shape can get pretty nasty. But luckily, the equation also works when the bodies are spherical and uniformly dense*. In this case, you take r to be the distance between the mass centres.
[*In fact, they don't need to be uniformly dense. It is enough that, in each, the density is only a function of distance from the centre.]
 

Related to What is the force of attraction between mars and the satellite?

What is the force of attraction between Mars and the satellite?

The force of attraction between Mars and the satellite is known as the gravitational force. It is the force that pulls objects towards each other due to their masses.

How is the force of attraction calculated?

The force of attraction between Mars and the satellite is calculated using Newton's law of universal gravitation: F = G(m1m2)/d^2, where F is the force, G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects, and d is the distance between them.

Does the force of attraction vary between Mars and different satellites?

Yes, the force of attraction between Mars and a satellite can vary based on the mass and distance of the satellite from Mars. The greater the mass of the satellite, the stronger the force of attraction. The farther the satellite is from Mars, the weaker the force of attraction.

How does the force of attraction affect the orbit of the satellite?

The force of attraction between Mars and the satellite affects the orbit of the satellite by keeping it in a consistent path around Mars. The gravitational force acts as a centripetal force, keeping the satellite in orbit without flying off into space.

Can the force of attraction between Mars and the satellite be changed?

Yes, the force of attraction between Mars and the satellite can be changed by altering the mass or distance of either object. For example, if the satellite's mass is increased, the force of attraction will increase, pulling it closer to Mars. Similarly, if the satellite's distance from Mars is increased, the force of attraction will decrease, causing the satellite to orbit at a greater distance.

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