What main wavelengths are within sunlight (p.s. not a hw problem)

In summary, the giant fresnel lenses ordered online are optimized for the visible region of the spectrum and can generate high temperatures using both infrared and visible light. Polished aluminum may be the best material for reflecting the energy, but it ultimately depends on what the object is made of and its absorption properties. There are some materials that do not heat up in the IR and visible wavelength spectrum, but most solids have absorption peaks in those regions.
  • #1
rasgar
32
0
I ordered these giant fesnel lenses online. They are about 2.6 by 3.3 feet, and can supposedly melt asphalt. I was just wondering what is the main wavelength that causes the energy: visible light, ultra-violet, infrared, some other that I don't know about, or all of them?
 
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  • #3
So would polished aluminum be the best for reflecting it, or would some aluminum-gold alloy be more effective in reflecting it?
 
  • #4
I talked to an optical engineer, and she said that the energy came from the infrared spectrum, but it doesn't seem to make much sense since its a weak wavelength.
 
  • #5
rasgar said:
I talked to an optical engineer, and she said that the energy came from the infrared spectrum, but it doesn't seem to make much sense since its a weak wavelength.

But she is right. The majority of the radiant heat from the sun is in the IR spectrum.

Zz.
 
  • #6
So the high temperature that the fresnel lens can generate is from infrared or visible light (i.e. which one could cause that temperature change alone)?
 
  • #7
rasgar said:
So the high temperature that the fresnel lens can generate...
"Generate" in what object? That's one aspect of the problem to keep in mind as well. Different materials will absorb more light from different wavelengths. Most solids have absorption peaks around the IR and visible regions. How quickly you can heat up a thing with specific wavelengths depends on what the thing is made of.
 
  • #8
Gokul43201 said:
Different materials will absorb more light from different wavelengths. Most solids have absorption peaks around the IR and visible regions. How quickly you can heat up a thing with specific wavelengths depends on what the thing is made of.

Out of curiosity, does anyone have any examples of a material that does not heat up in the IR and visible wavelength spectrum?
 

Related to What main wavelengths are within sunlight (p.s. not a hw problem)

1. What are the main wavelengths present in sunlight?

The main wavelengths present in sunlight are visible light, infrared radiation, and ultraviolet radiation.

2. How is sunlight produced?

Sunlight is produced through a process called nuclear fusion, where hydrogen atoms are converted into helium under intense heat and pressure.

3. What is the effect of each wavelength in sunlight?

Visible light allows us to see, infrared radiation provides heat, and ultraviolet radiation can cause sunburns and damage to our skin.

4. How does the Earth's atmosphere affect sunlight?

The Earth's atmosphere acts as a filter for sunlight, absorbing some wavelengths and allowing others to pass through. This is what creates the different colors we see during sunrise and sunset.

5. Can we see all of the wavelengths present in sunlight?

No, we can only see a small portion of the wavelengths present in sunlight. Our eyes are only sensitive to the visible light spectrum, which is why we cannot see infrared or ultraviolet radiation.

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