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What will be the most interesting improvement in science?

  1. Jun 6, 2009 #1

    Borg

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    What will be the most interesting improvement in technology?

    I like to read up on new advances in science and often read about fantastic predictions in science. For example, in the world of television:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081002084217.htm"

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050329140351.htm"

    Combining the paintable screen with this thread about a new XBox system (https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=318052"), I could easily picture having a room with all of the walls specially painted to create a two-dimensional(?) holodeck.

    Question: What do you think will be some of the most interesting improvements in science?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
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  3. Jun 6, 2009 #2

    ZapperZ

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    What you have in mind appears to be more in "improvements in TECHNOLOGY" rather than "science".

    Zz.
     
  4. Jun 6, 2009 #3

    Borg

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    I stand corrected. Technology it is.
     
  5. Jun 6, 2009 #4

    Astronuc

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    Development of processses and systems in measurement and testing technology
    http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de/eng/100428.html [Broken]

    Laser profilometry, laser range finding, and laser-based inspection systems have all been developed to a high degree, and new developments are still underway.

    Development of plants and systems in laser material processing
    http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de/eng/100429.html [Broken]

    Development of laser and plasma sources
    http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de/eng/100431.html [Broken]

    Laser-based inertial confinement fusion is perhaps around the corner.
    https://lasers.llnl.gov/programs/nif/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Jun 6, 2009 #5
    In Science, we need more techniques for solving strongly coupled nonlinear systems.

    In technology, there really is no limit!
     
  7. Jun 6, 2009 #6
    400 GB USB thumb drives
     
  8. Jun 6, 2009 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    In the long term, life extension. Some experts think that the normal lifespan of humans might be extended to 400 years.

    In general, the coming medical advances could be as dramatic as those we have seen in information technology.
     
  9. Jun 6, 2009 #8

    Pyrrhus

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    This is true. Just look at the research being done at UMN.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/j9hEFUpTVPA&hl=en&fs=1&"></param><param [Broken] name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/j9hEFUpTVPA&hl=en&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  10. Jun 6, 2009 #9
    To answer the original title's question. I think the most interesting improvement in science will be, when we kick out the economists and impact factor accountants again.
     
  11. Jun 6, 2009 #10

    Astronuc

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    Not a good idea. The earth is crowded as it is. Besides, I doubt the brain could function more than the current limit.
     
  12. Jun 6, 2009 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    What special limit do you assign the brain?

    Indeed, it is the stuff of science fiction horror stories. The most likely to get access to such technology would be the rich and powerful.
     
  13. Jun 6, 2009 #12
    So instead of retiring at 65, people will get to wait until they're over 300. That's a rather long time in the work force.
     
  14. Jun 6, 2009 #13

    Ivan Seeking

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    380 Years of marriage, anyone? :biggrin: 350 is the new 40.

    The implications of such a technology are truely profound on many levels. There are even some on the fringes of science claiming that immortality might be possible to the extent that the average person is likely to live about 1000 years before something like a Mack truck takes them out.

    Ringworld's Puppeteers then come to mind.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2009
  15. Jun 6, 2009 #14

    Astronuc

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    Degeneration of brain tissue comes with age. One could conceivably replace organs, but the brain is irreplacable.

    What would be the purpose of living 300 or 400 years?
     
  16. Jun 6, 2009 #15
    What would be the purpose of suicide?
     
  17. Jun 6, 2009 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    Dengeneration is what they intend to, and to some degree have learned how to stop. The working hypothesis is that aging itself can be dramatically slowed. Also, it has been shown that brain tissue can regenerate.

    Does that really require an answer? Who wants to die?
     
  18. Jun 6, 2009 #17

    Ivan Seeking

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    Here are a few links that discuss the current work and debate related to aging.


    http://longevity.about.com/od/researchandmedicine/p/telomeres.htm

    http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/2004/18/nf47

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/health...lp_scientists_to_tease_apart_different_types/
     
  19. Jun 6, 2009 #18
    We've been doing life extension for just about all of history now. A life expectancy of 80 years is nowhere near natural. You can't stop it, it'll keep progressing. People who are alive now are going to get the benefits of medical advances from the next 20 years which will allow them to live long enough for even further advancements, etc etc. It's true, we probably need to figure out a good way to help the brain from deteriorating (for a lack of a better term).
     
  20. Jun 6, 2009 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    Yes, I have read about this as well - the idea that with the first advances in anti-aging technology, those who benefit will live long enough to see more dramatic advances that allow them to live even longer, which are followed by more advances that allow them to live longer... A trip to the doctor's office might one day be the biological equivalent of getting a Windows upgrade. :biggrin:
     
  21. Jun 6, 2009 #20

    Ygggdrasil

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    I agree. Advances in this area would greatly help my field of study (quantitative biology) as well as many others.
     
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