What's the energy source for the Van der Waals' forces?

In summary: It is constantly being converted and transferred between different forms, but it ultimately comes from the Big Bang. In summary, the Debye's force, which is the electrostatic interaction between dipoles and charges, is the source of energy that attracts and repels molecules. This energy is constantly conserved and originates from the Big Bang.
  • #1
Mario Rossi
31
5
Hi, I know that if you put a dipole and a neutral molecule at a certain distance, there is the Debye's force that attract them. If you put the same molecules in the first position, they will attract another time.

I know this can be a stupid answers, but what's the font of that energy? The permanent charge of the paricles? If yes, is it the energy of the Big Bang?
 
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  • #2
Hi,

With font you mean source, right ?
And I would say the electrostatic field from the charges is the source. Dipoles interact. Charges interact. It's what they do for a living.

Searching for anything deeper gets you into endless threads with less relevant content :rolleyes: (there will be folks with a different opinion, though).
 
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  • #3
BvU said:
Hi,

With font you mean source, right ?
And I would say the electrostatic field from the charges is the source. Dipoles interact. Charges interact. It's what they do for a living.

Searching for anything deeper gets you into endless threads with less relevant content :rolleyes: (there will be folks with a different opinion, though).

Thank you very much! Yes I mean source, sorry for my bad english :D. Anyway, is that source the Big Bang energy? The charges are the elementary particles, with a permanent charge, so that charge is alimented by the Big Bang energy, is it correct?
 
  • #4
BvU said:
Hi,

With font you mean source, right ?
And I would say the electrostatic field from the charges is the source. Dipoles interact. Charges interact. It's what they do for a living.

Searching for anything deeper gets you into endless threads with less relevant content :rolleyes: (there will be folks with a different opinion, though).

If you put the system in the starting situation every time the forces are present and re-attracts/repells the moleculs in the same way, creating a loop, isn'it right? But the source of energy should finish, or no?
 
  • #5
Energy is conserved
 
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Related to What's the energy source for the Van der Waals' forces?

1. What is the energy source for Van der Waals' forces?

The energy source for Van der Waals' forces is the fluctuating dipole moment of molecules. This dipole moment is caused by the uneven distribution of electrons in a molecule, which leads to temporary attraction between molecules.

2. How do Van der Waals' forces differ from other types of intermolecular forces?

Van der Waals' forces are weaker than other types of intermolecular forces, such as hydrogen bonding or covalent bonding. They are also dependent on distance, with the strength of the force decreasing as the distance between molecules increases.

3. Can Van der Waals' forces be attractive or repulsive?

Van der Waals' forces can be both attractive and repulsive, depending on the distance between molecules. At shorter distances, the forces are attractive, while at longer distances, they become repulsive.

4. How do Van der Waals' forces contribute to the properties of materials?

Van der Waals' forces play a crucial role in the properties of materials, such as surface tension, boiling point, and viscosity. These forces also contribute to the strength of materials, particularly in substances that have weak intermolecular forces.

5. Can Van der Waals' forces be manipulated or controlled?

Yes, Van der Waals' forces can be manipulated or controlled by changing the distance between molecules. This can be done through external factors such as temperature, pressure, or the presence of other molecules. Manipulating these forces can also affect the physical properties of materials.

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