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Classical Which book should I buy to understand Maxwell's Equations deeply

  • Thread starter guiablo
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I've already done Maxwell's equations in class but I would like another point of view, and to have a physical reference to check anytime I have a doubt, so I would like a quite high lvl electrodymacis book but that does not focus only in concrete subjects, I mean a book that covers al the essential with deep mathematical and physics treatment.

I've been recomended:

Classical electrodynamics by Jhon David Jackson
The typical feyman lectures
Electricity and Magnetism by Nayfeh and Brussel
Principles of Electrodynamics by Schwartz

I would like to hear you opinions, on which book you think is the best and why.

[Mentors' note: This post has been edited to remove some discussion of which of these books can be most easily stolen.]
 
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Jackson’s book is all you need for classical electrodynamics, it’s about as comprehensive as a textbook can get. However if you’re looking to understand Electrodynamics on a more fundamental level...you’ll need a QFT text for that.
 

vanhees71

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Well, Jackson is great, but I think a very important point is to get a more modern view on the foundations, i.e., the relativistic description. Schwartz is an excellent source for this. Then there's of course Landau&Lifshitz vol. 2, which comes to the point much quicker ;-)).
 

marcusl

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I love Schwartz’s book, but it is not as comprehensive as Jackson or L&L. Use it as a supplement. If you choose L&L instead, then you need to add Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (vol. 8) to vol. 2 (Classical Theory of Fields), to fully cover E&M.
 

Cryo

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I also support Jackson. The book has a lot of details and also takes time to develop at most of the necessary maths.
 
Well Schwartz is good for a first foray into classical electrodynamics at the undergrad level, Jackson is much more advanced and does not hold back on the mathematics.
 

Cryo

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Well Schwartz is good for a first foray into classical electrodynamics at the undergrad level, Jackson is much more advanced and does not hold back on the mathematics.

I think OP specifically mentioned:

I mean a book that covers al the essential with deep mathematical and physics treatment.
 

Andy Resnick

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Jackson’s book is all you need for classical electrodynamics, it’s about as comprehensive as a textbook can get. However if you’re looking to understand Electrodynamics on a more fundamental level...you’ll need a QFT text for that.
I don't really know what you mean by QFT, I'm not english so maybe it's an abreviation i haven't used, can someone translate it for a poor boy like me, tyy.
 
Well it seems I'll go for Jackson's one then, and I'll try to get Schwartz aswell in the future, thanks a lot.

P.d. any one know Inteoduction to Electrodynamics by David J.Griffiths? Any thought?
 

BvU

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don't really know what you mean by QFT
A little googling can change that.

Griffiths is good -- Jackson may be too ambitious.
 
A little googling can change that.
Done, I get it, Jackson will be, I thought it was some type of techical term.

Well Im quite an ambitious person soo, I'll check Griffith's in the library but i think I'm gonna keep with Jackson's ty
 

vanhees71

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Griffith's electrodynamics book is a pretty good introductory textbook.
 
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