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Classical What book should I study for basic Physics?

So, I actually haven't had read a textbook on physics except for Mechanics, and I would like to self-study the classical physics topics.
For my mathematics, I know till basic Calculus(Currently studying Thomas Calculus).
So I studied first "The Project Physics Course, Concepts of Motion unit 1", and I really liked it, but it just included basic algebra, and therefor it wasn't that detailed, and it was old. I read another book(I didn't find its Engilsh version) about Mechanics, but it really just focused on mathematics and solving problems and examples, which is not my goal. I found the book: "Principles of Physics" by "Raymond A. Serway" and "John W. Jewett", but I'm not sure if it would be suitable for me, any advice?
 

FactChecker

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A standard first-year college text is Halliday and Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics. It has been a long-time favorite.

PS. I wouldn't worry about getting the latest edition if the price difference is too much (it looks very expensive). Earlier editions are probably good enough.
 
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PhanthomJay

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So, I actually haven't had read a textbook on physics except for Mechanics, and I would like to self-study the classical physics topics.
For my mathematics, I know till basic Calculus(Currently studying Thomas Calculus).
So I studied first "The Project Physics Course, Concepts of Motion unit 1", and I really liked it, but it just included basic algebra, and therefor it wasn't that detailed, and it was old. I read another book(I didn't find its Engilsh version) about Mechanics, but it really just focused on mathematics and solving problems and examples, which is not my goal. I found the book: "Principles of Physics" by "Raymond A. Serway" and "John W. Jewett", but I'm not sure if it would be suitable for me, any advice?
Try University Physics by Young and Freedman. Or Fundamentals of Physics by Halliday , Walker , and Resnick. Be sure it is calculus based. These are two of the best, in my mind.
 
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Alonso and Finn University Physics. Supplement with any run of the mill introductory book.
 
Alonso and Finn University Physics. Supplement with any run of the mill introductory book.
Yeah, I actually tried to study it, although it was on my level, it wasn't what I wanted, so I chose another one.
 
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Yeah, I actually tried to study it, although it was on my level, it wasn't what I wanted, so I chose another one.
It does non standard introductory topics, that are usually introduced in upper division courses. Was it too hard?

Because it is leagues above the resnick book...
 
It does non standard introductory topics, that are usually introduced in upper division courses. Was it too hard?

Because it is leagues above the resnick book...
Oh, I just noticed that I was thinking you were saying University Physics by Young and Freedman, I recently searched the one by Alonso and Finn but just found vol 3, which was just too hard, any other recommendation?(Becuase I didn't like the one by Young and Freedman and nor did I like Fundamentals of Physics.)
 
What didn't you like about it? This might help others guide you to a book that you might like better.
For University Physics by Young and Freedman and Fundamentals of Physics, maybe because they focused on examples and problems, and not including a little history, to know what happened so now they are thinking like that or how was the previous models. I'm studying Physics Course Motion in the Heavens, which I really like it, although it is not very detailed becuase of using just basic algebra.
 

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A great reference for understanding and motivating physics principles is Feynman's lectures. There are several volumes. They are available for free online at The Feynman Lectures on Physics
You should at least be aware of these lectures and they may be very helpful in spots for motivation.
 
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Oh, I just noticed that I was thinking you were saying University Physics by Young and Freedman, I recently searched the one by Alonso and Finn but just found vol 3, which was just too hard, any other recommendation?(Becuase I didn't like the one by Young and Freedman and nor did I like Fundamentals of Physics.)
If you found Alonso hard, then you may want to start reading the Mechanics (volume 1) and working up .The third volume is the richest, and talks about some really neat stuff! To my knowledge almost all physics book (introductory) are the same as Young, Serway, Resnick etc.

Alonso builds everything from th ground up and explains the why, and how, and why do we even care. Really neat derivation of the Lorentz Transformation. If I recall correctly, Momentum is discussed first, and is used to derive Newtons 2nd Law.


There are exceptions such as KK, Irodov for Mechanics. Purcell, Kip for EM. SO you either stick it out with Alonso (1st volume) and supplement it, or use one of the run mill books.
 
To my knowledge almost all physics book (introductory) are the same as Young, Serway, Resnick etc.
So it is only me who doesn't like that kind of books.
Alonso builds everything from the ground up and explains the why, and how, and why do we even care. Really neat derivation of the Lorentz Transformation. If I recall correctly, Momentum is discussed first, and is used to derive Newtons 2nd Law.
I finally could find vol1
Sounds great. For mathematics until now, I now till single variable calculus, is it enough or is there any other prerequisites?
Thanks for your help.
 

TSny

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If you are looking for a text that is at approximately the same level as Young, etc., but is very different in style, take a look at Newtonian Mechanics by A. P. French. Used copies are available for about $10.

It is part of the MIT series of introductory physics texts which I think are very good. (Don't worry about the fact that these texts were written about 50 years ago.)
 
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So it is only me who doesn't like that kind of books.

I finally could find vol1
Sounds great. For mathematics until now, I now till single variable calculus, is it enough or is there any other prerequisites?
Thanks for your help.
I felt the same. I am in mathematics major who dabbles with Physics. I found those books wordy and too many graphics. And they were scared to use simple mathematics.

As you can see, Alonso reads “similar” to a mathematics books. No wasted words. Crisp black and white diagrams that are not meaningless. When I need to recall something from any material contained in those 3 volumes, I think of the diagrams in the textbook and go from there.

You should be fine with the math. What’s important is that you know the results of Euclidean Geometry and Trig identities and properties of basic trig functions.
 

vanhees71

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Then try Sommerfeld's 6-volume Lectures on Theoretical Physics. After all these decades they are still among the best treatments of classical physics ever written!
 
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Thank you! Will check this out. I don't think my physics is up to par yet, but these books look promising.
 
Thanks for all of your suggestions! :smile::smile:
 
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Then try Sommerfeld's 6-volume Lectures on Theoretical Physics. After all these decades they are still among the best treatments of classical physics ever written!
Have these been republished? Or anything to know about when buying used copies?
 
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So it is only me who doesn't like that kind of books.
It may be just nostalgia, but I like the old, old editions. E.g. 3rd Edition for R&H Physics, which I think has an elegant layout. In 2 volumes (easier to read) or combined.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0471717169/?tag=pfamazon01-20
(Stock image is wrong. Make sure the seller has the book with the exact ISBN.)
https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Part-2-David-Halliday/dp/0471345296
https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Parts-II-David-Halliday/dp/047134530X
 

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