Why don't humans regrow lost limbs?

  • Thread starter Rob060870
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  • #26
You're not disagreeing :smile:

In the embryo that scaffolding has to be setup by gradients and growth factors, etc While the cells contain the DNA to setup those gradients, I'm not sure you could say that tissue's truly self-organize (at least not in the way, you might think of a virus self organizing).

Its wonderfully demonstrated by growing tissue types outside the body. You can harvest a bunch of kidney cells and grow them in a dish, yet they don't self-assemble into a kidney. They require the interactions of friends of neighbors to do so (not to mention a host of other cells types, mostly connective in nature, to add any kind of tissue assembly).


I agree with the second part of your post, which is why I said in my first post on this topic;
Hmmm, you're right.

Madcat8000: I don't know that I'd like to depend on a VERY distant relation to amphibians and render that code into an exon... then hope.
 
  • #27
Pythagorean
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What about through technology, though? Wouldn't it be possible to use the mechanisms of the salamander's themselves in a technological application of human regrowth?

I remember people have, in recent years, been able to print organs on a Hewlett-Packard printer:

http://www.hpprintercartridges.co.uk/blog/printers-used-to-print-cells-skin-and-organs/

What if we actually designed a technology that printed right onto the human body? The problem with the HP printers (when I heard about them, years ago, in casual conversation) was that the top layers of cells (of say, a heart) were dying before the last layer of cells were printed.

If we could print them directly onto humans somehow... wouldn't the patients host cells keep the tissue alive? And then you could, like, precision laser errors out and reprint? Is this sound in principle? I don't think anyone's "printed" bone either, so that's another complication.
 
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  • #28
Borek
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The point is, we say that embryonic tissues are "self-organizing"-but their really directed by the interactions of all the different cell types.
So we say they are "self-organizing" because they are self-organizing :devil:

There's not really any reason to suspect that that process could be easily (if possible at all) duplicated outside of embryonic development.
I never stated it will be possible for sure, however - as I stated earlier - we are surrounded by things that were considered ridiculous years ago.
 
  • #29
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And in order to know about the conditions under which limbs may develop, it is extremely unlikely that we won't harvest a lot of knowledge of how those tissues actually work in the process.
And THAT knowledge might perfectly well be put to more fruitful&economical uses than going for a program of laborious organic regrowth.
You are mistaking recipe with a cake :smile:
 
  • #30
Human lost limbs can grow from stumps. Not by themselves like those of lizards, but when a special surgical technology is applied. It is known that http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilizarov_apparatus" [Broken] is used for limb lengthening through lengthening its bone. In a similar way one can lengthen the bone of a stump. Then this bone can be split for to form fingers and other small bones of a palm or of a foot. Soft tissues can be formed by means of plastic surgery.

So, nowadays, lost limbs can be reconstructed without any genomics and stem cells. I would be glad to participate in a group for to implement this idea into practice. Please, let me know contacts of a hospital or a clinic conducting such a research or interested in starting such a research.
 
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  • #31
Borek
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So, nowadays, lost limbs can be reconstructed without any genomics and stem cells.
Remember, we are not talking about reconstructing something that LOOKS like a limb, we are talking about reconstructing something that SERVES as a limb.
 
  • #32
If you reconstruct bones, and muscles, and blood vessels, and nerves, and joints, and skin,
then your item LOOKING like a limb will SERVE as a limb.
 
  • #33
Borek
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If you reconstruct bones, and muscles, and blood vessels, and nerves, and joints, and skin, then your item LOOKING like a limb will SERVE as a limb.
So, nowadays, lost limbs can be reconstructed without any genomics and stem cells.
Do you have any evidence to support a claim that it is currently possible?
 
  • #34
Do you have any evidence to support a claim that it is currently possible?
No, I have not. But I am looking for the opportunity to prove that it is possible in a way I have described in rough details!
 
  • #35
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I believe that it is possible and with time will be done as the progress that Mankind is making is exponential and the fact that it already happens in other animals even though they are quite different from us proves that amazing regeneration is possible.
 
  • #36
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(there seems to be a problem as my last post seems to disappear unless I send another after it!)

I believe that it is possible and with time will be done as the progress that Mankind is making is exponential and the fact that it already happens in other animals even though they are quite different from us proves that amazing regeneration is possible.
 

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