Why Use the Parallel Axis Theorem with the Second Moment of AREA?

In summary, the Parallel Axis Theorem is used to calculate the second moment of area for more complex cross-sections.
  • #1
tomtomtom1
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TL;DR Summary
Why Use The Parallel Axis Theorem For With Second Moment of AREA???
Hi all

I was wondering if someone could help clear up some confusion about the Parallel Axis Theorem.

I am trying to understand the purpose/benefit of applying the Parallel Axis Theorem with respect too the Second Moment Of Area.

For example I have a beam that is under load.

I have found its centroid axis from which i can calculate the second moment of area about the x-axis (using the equation bh^3/12) which would tell me the resistance to bending in about the X axis.

Now if i use the Parallel Axis Theorem to calculate the second moment of area from the base of my shape which is a distance d below the neutral axis then what does that tell me? how does this help me?

Below is a sketch of my thinking?
p11.JPG
I am struggling to understand why taking the second moment of area from somewhere other than the neutral axis helps in anyway.

I know it helps with Second Moment Of Mass but i just want to get my head around applying the Parallel Axis Theorem to Second Moment of Area for now.

Does this make sense?
 
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  • #2
You would use the parallel axis theorem to shift to the bottom fiber only if there was a reason to do so, such as combining this section with another. The theorem is never required. Use it only when it helps.
 
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  • #3
I think it is usually employed to obtain the second moment of area of more complex cross-sections, e.g. I or H beams, or even arbitrary cross-sections.
 
  • #4
Vigardo said:
I think it is usually employed to obtain the second moment of area of more complex cross-sections, e.g. I or H beams, or even arbitrary cross-sections.

Yes, this is correct. This particularly often is important for a welded section composed of many simple shapes.
 
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Related to Why Use the Parallel Axis Theorem with the Second Moment of AREA?

1. Why is the Parallel Axis Theorem important in science?

The Parallel Axis Theorem is important in science because it allows us to calculate the moment of inertia (a measure of an object's resistance to rotation) for complex shapes. This is crucial for understanding how objects move and interact in the physical world.

2. How does the Parallel Axis Theorem work?

The Parallel Axis Theorem states that the moment of inertia of an object can be calculated by adding the moment of inertia of the object's center of mass and the product of its mass and the square of the distance between the center of mass and the axis of rotation. This allows us to calculate the moment of inertia for objects that are not simple, uniform shapes.

3. What is the Second Moment of Area?

The Second Moment of Area, also known as the moment of inertia about an axis, is a measure of an object's resistance to bending. It is calculated by multiplying the area of the object by the square of the distance from the axis of rotation. In the context of the Parallel Axis Theorem, it is used to calculate the moment of inertia for complex shapes.

4. Why is the Second Moment of Area used with the Parallel Axis Theorem?

The Second Moment of Area is used with the Parallel Axis Theorem because it allows us to calculate the moment of inertia for complex shapes that cannot be easily calculated using other methods. By adding the Second Moment of Area to the moment of inertia of the object's center of mass, we can accurately calculate the moment of inertia for any shape.

5. What are the practical applications of using the Parallel Axis Theorem with the Second Moment of Area?

The Parallel Axis Theorem and the Second Moment of Area have many practical applications in science and engineering. They are used to calculate the stability of structures, design machinery and vehicles, and understand the behavior of objects in motion. They are also important in fields such as materials science, where the moment of inertia is crucial for understanding the properties of materials.

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