Wind chill is heat transfer by?

In summary, convection is the primary cause of heat loss when wind is present. Conduction also plays a role, but without convection, there would be no significant difference in temperature. The wind carries away warm air from around your skin, constantly exposing it to cooler air and causing heat to be transferred away from your body.
  • #1
wakejosh
102
0
convection right?
 
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  • #2
wakejosh said:
convection right?

I think that is only part of it. Convection keeps the ambient air temperature from rising. It takes more than that to make you feel cold.
 
  • #3
Convection would be more associated with the production of the wind itself than actual chill.
 
  • #4
When the wind blows against your skin, you interact with more air molecules, transferring more heat. That's why the wind chill factor is an apparent temperature change; the temperature is the same, but heat is conducted away from you more quickly. Kind of like how a hot tub at 100 degrees feels much hotter than air at 100 degrees. Same temperature, different conductivity.
 
  • #5
so would it be Conduction instead of Convection? I don't have the right version of the book and I can't figure out what he wants here for the life of me. my only options are conduction, convection, and radiation.
 
  • #6
I'm not entirely sure. I want to say convection...
 
  • #7
wakejosh said:
so would it be Conduction instead of Convection? I don't have the right version of the book and I can't figure out what he wants here for the life of me. my only options are conduction, convection, and radiation.
Convection is what changes for wind compared to no wind, but if there were no conduction it would not make any difference. If your skin were a perfect insulator, you would feel no difference when the wind blows. When the air is still, a layer of warm air builds up around you. Clothing provides a region of captured warm air that keeps you reasonably comfortable on cold days. If you take that layer of warm air away, your body loses heat faster by conduction to the cold air. Of course there is all kinds of convection going on inside your body as well, with blood flowing through your extremities.
 
  • #8
I think the point here is that, technically, ALL heat transfer from one medium to an adjacent medium involves conduction. If not, there would be zero transfer from your skin to the air.

Then again, if conduction were ALL there was to it, then the air around you would warm up and keep you blanketed in a layer of warm air.

Convection is the process whereby that warm air is carried away, drawing cool air next to your skin where it can continue to draw more heat off.

So, while there is conduction occurring, the primary cause of heat loss is convection.
 

Related to Wind chill is heat transfer by?

1. What is wind chill?

Wind chill is a measure of how cold it feels outside when the wind is blowing. It takes into account both the actual air temperature and the speed of the wind.

2. How is wind chill calculated?

Wind chill is calculated using a mathematical formula that takes into account the air temperature and the wind speed. The formula was developed by scientists to better understand how the wind affects our perception of cold.

3. Why is wind chill important?

Wind chill is important because it helps us understand how the wind can make the temperature feel colder than it actually is. This information is useful for planning outdoor activities and for taking precautions to stay warm in cold and windy conditions.

4. Is wind chill a real temperature?

No, wind chill is not a real temperature. It is a perceived temperature that takes into account the effects of wind on our bodies. The actual air temperature remains the same, but the wind chill makes it feel colder due to the increased heat transfer.

5. Does wind chill only affect humans?

No, wind chill can affect any living organism that is exposed to cold and windy conditions. It can also affect objects and structures, causing them to cool down more quickly than in still air. Animals and plants can also experience the effects of wind chill.

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